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Posted by: | Posted on: June 16, 2021

New cloud-based platform to support charities with governance & compliance

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis21 Melanie May | 6 June 2018 | News A cloud-based platform aimed at helping charities with their governance and compliance launches this month, with charities invited to take part in the pilot.The Charity Excellence Framework has been developed and self-funded by Ian McLintock, who has worked in the sector since 2003, as well as volunteering for 40 years. His roles have included founding board member, Chair of Governance Committee and Company Secretary of the Aylesbury Vale Community Trust, CEO of The London Irish Centre, and International Operations Director of The Climate Group. Having previously created a number of performance systems in large organisations, he has now turned his focus to the charity sector.The Charity Excellence Framework platform has been designed to be affordable and low workload. It supports charities with their governance and compliance by providing their boards and CEOs with the means to assess and manage their performance across a number of key areas, as well as work out where they need to make improvements. It does this by creating a unique model for each nonprofit, based on its size, location, role and activities, with eight diagnostic questionnaires and reporting via a dashboard that tracks more than 20 key metrics. Reports are optimised for the nonprofit’s specific priorities and results are linked individually to resources from across the web.Charity Excellence Framework dashboardThe web-based platform also helps with compliance, by using nearly 50 metrics to track a range of issues including safeguarding, harassment and whistleblowing.McLintock said:“I’ve been a passionate volunteer for 40 years and wanted to do something to help address the huge challenges we face.  I’d previously built systems for large organisations, so I’ve spent two years and my savings building one for the voluntary sector that’s easy to use, low workload and low cost, but equally capable.  Revenue from it will fund even more ambitious plans.”Phase one of the launch takes place this month, with subsequent phases to be funded from revenue and to include creating a charity sector data store, online stakeholder engagement linked to the system and a Fit-to-Practice qualification for CEOs. Charities interested in participating in the pilot will be able to access the platform for free. Registration for this is via the Charity Excellence Framework site. Advertisement New cloud-based platform to support charities with governance & compliance About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.  218 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis21 Tagged with: compliance governance Technology  217 total views,  1 views todaylast_img read more

Posted by: | Posted on: November 18, 2020

WHO: Certain H1N1 cases may predict antiviral resistance

first_imgSep 25, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – While antiviral-resistant H1N1 influenza viruses remain rare, clinicians should watch for two particular kinds of H1N1 cases that seem more likely to give rise to viruses resistant to oseltamivir (Tamiflu), the World Health Organization (WHO) said today.So far, 28 oseltamivir-resistant viruses have been detected worldwide, the WHO said in today’s statement. Twelve of these were linked to use of the drug for postexposure prophylaxis, and 6 were in patients who had severe immunosuppression. Four more cases involved other patients being treated with the drug, and 2 patients were not on the drug.In view of the findings, the WHO urged clinicians to watch for resistance in:Patients with severely compromised or suppressed immune systems who have prolonged H1N1 illness and have received oseltamivir (especially if for a long time) but still have evidence of viral replicationPeople who receive preventive oseltamivir after exposure to another infected person but then get sick anyway”In both of these clinical situations, health care staff should respond with a high level of suspicion that oseltamivir resistance has developed,” the WHO said. “Laboratory investigation should be undertaken to determine whether resistant virus is present, and appropriate infection control measures should be implemented or reinforced to prevent spread of the resistant virus.”The agency also recommended conducting epidemiologic investigations in such situations to find out if a resistant virus has spread to anyone else.Person-to-person transmission of resistant H1N1 viruses has not yet been clearly shown, the WHO said. Local transmission may have occurred in some situations, but it didn’t lead to ongoing or wider transmission.The agency also said the resistant viruses do not seem to cause different or more severe symptoms. Except for immunocompromised patients, those infected with resistant viruses have had typical flu cases.The WHO does not generally recommend using oseltamivir to prevent H1N1 illness, today’s statement noted. For people who have been exposed and are at risk for a severe case, an alternative is close monitoring and early treatment if symptoms develop.In August the agency recommended against antiviral treatment for previously healthy people with uncomplicated H1N1 cases. It stressed prompt antiviral treatment for those with severe illness, pregnant women, and people with conditions such as asthma, obesity, or diabetes.See also: Sep 25 WHO statement on antivirals and resistancehttp://www.who.int/csr/disease/swineflu/notes/h1n1_antiviral_use_20090925/en/index.htmlAug 21 CIDRAP News story “WHO: In treating H1N1, save antivirals for high-risk cases”last_img read more