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Posted by: | Posted on: October 24, 2019

Legal Aid Council Safeguarding Citizens’ Rights Under Enhanced Security Measures

first_img “In many instances, persons do not have the means to obtain legal representation… so we have a duty to fulfil (that entitlement) on behalf of those persons. So whatever we do, it is not to undermine any (security) effort, but to ensure that the ordinary citizen is equitably and humanely treated,” the Executive Director said. Executive Director of the Legal Aid Council, Hugh Faulkner, has reiterated the agency’s commitment to safeguarding citizens’ rights, particularly while enhanced security measures are being administered in some communities to curb crime.He said that as the Government implements measures to ensure public safety, the Council has a duty to play its role in preserving individuals’ fundamental rights.“In many instances, persons do not have the means to obtain legal representation… so we have a duty to fulfil (that entitlement) on behalf of those persons. So whatever we do, it is not to undermine any (security) effort, but to ensure that the ordinary citizen is equitably and humanely treated,” the Executive Director said.The Government announced a State of Public Emergency for St James in January, consequent on the upsurge in crime in the parish, as part of efforts to restore peace and public safety.Mr. Faulkner, who noted that the protection of human rights is fundamental to that dispensation, provided a breakdown of the entitlements of persons detained.He said detainees have the right to be informed about the reason for their detention, as soon as is reasonably convenient and in a language that is clearly understood.Detainees also have a right to due process, inclusive of legal representation and medical treatment as well as the provision of food and clothing.These persons also have the right to be visited by a spouse, partner or family member, religious counsellor and a medical practitioner of their choice.“He/she must be treated humanely and with respect for the inherent dignity of the person. In other words, the conditions of his/her detention should not violate the inherent human dignity… the presumption of innocence tags along with the detainee. He/she cannot be compelled to testify or make any statements against himself,” Mr. Faulkner explained.Special provisions must also be facilitated if a minor is detained. The name of the child is not to be published, and the minor must be held at a facility that is suitable for children. The juvenile is also entitled to have his or her parent(s) or guardian(s) present if he/she is being interrogated.Detainees also have the right to request a review of their detention or restriction of their freedom of movement through the Emergency Powers Review Tribunal.The Tribunal, located at the Office of the Prime Minister in Montego Bay, St. James, will review cases of detention or restriction orders in accordance with regulations 22, 32, and 33 of the Emergency Powers Act.Mr. Faulkner urged persons to contact the Legal Aid Council if they believe their rights have been violated during the State of Public Emergency operations.They may visit the Montego Bay Legal Aid Clinic, located at 42B Union Street; contact the Cornwall Bar Association at 312-8215; or the Legal Aid Council office in Kingston at 948-4861 or email [email protected] may also visit the regional office of the Public Defender, located at Shop 18, St. Claver Avenue, Montego Bay.Under the Emergency Powers Regulations 2018, the security forces have been given extraordinary powers, which include the authorisation to arrest without a warrant and detain pending investigation any person whose behaviour gives reasonable grounds to believe that they are acting in a manner deemed prejudicial to public safety, or if they have committed, are committing or are about to commit any other offence. Executive Director of the Legal Aid Council, Hugh Faulkner, has reiterated the agency’s commitment to safeguarding citizens’ rights, particularly while enhanced security measures are being administered in some communities to curb crime. Detainees also have a right to due process, inclusive of legal representation and medical treatment as well as the provision of food and clothing. Story Highlightslast_img read more

Posted by: | Posted on: October 14, 2019

Hypocritical Greenpeace use of Aboriginal people problematic Senator Brazeau

first_imgAPTN National NewsOTTAWA–Greenpeace is using Aboriginal people for the organization’s own aims in its fight against the tar sands, according to Conservative Senator Patrick Brazeau.Brazeau, an Aboriginal Senator, said that he found Greenpeace’s use of Aboriginal people in its campaigns “problematic.”Several prominent Aboriginal leaders participated in a protest this week in Ottawa against the tar sands. Greenpeace was one of the organizers of the event, along with the Indigenous Environmental Network and the Council of Canadians.About 117 people were arrested Monday during the protest which saw at least 400 people turn out to chant and wave signs condemning the expansion of the tar sands.“What is really problematic is when you have organizations like Greenpeace…who use Aboriginal leaders and communities to basically ask them to support their message,” said Brazeau, during APTN National News’ weekly political panel. “For organizations like that to use Aboriginal people when it is creating jobs and when it’s good for the economy and good for the country, I find it very hypocritical.”Brazeau said the tar sands employed about 1,600 Aboriginal people, making it the largest employer of Aboriginal people in the country.Brazeau also said some of the companies working in the tar sands were Aboriginal owned and managed.“Those are the hard, cold facts,” said Brazeau.NDP Aboriginal affairs critic Linda Duncan said Brazeau was forgetting that the Dene, Mikisew Cree, Fort McKay First Nation and the Athabasca Chipewyan were at the front and centre of opposition to the tar sand’s expansion.“They are the very people who have been intervening in hearing after hearing on the expansion or further development of the oil sands,” said Duncan. “They are the ones front and centre who are calling for a slow-down of this industry because the only source of income they are being given…is to work in the very industry that is destroying their health and their environment.”last_img read more

Posted by: | Posted on: October 14, 2019

Woman says late husband denied waiting list spot after health authorities allegedly

first_imgLaurie HamelinAPTN NewsThe widow of a deceased man says an allegedly repealed controversial organ transplant policy in British Columbia played a role her in late husband’s death two weeks ago.Gagan Grewal says her husband Gaurav Chopra died of liver disease on Aug. 3, and that his only chance for survival had been a liver transplant.Grewal reached out to APTN News after seeing the network’s story about David Dennis last week.Dennis made headlines after filing a human rights complaint against provincial health authorities after allegedly being denied a spot on the waiting list due to a policy that requires potential transplant recipients to be abstinent from drugs and alcohol for six months.After news of Dennis’ case went public, the Provincial Health Services Authority and B.C. Transplant said the former abstinence policy had been abandoned in May.When Gaurav was told he had end-stage liver disease in June, he had been alcohol-free since March — three months, says Grewal.“I should have fought more for him. I just trusted the doctors to do the right thing. I did trust the system a lot. I didn’t think they’ll just let him die,” she said.Grewal said Gaurav had an appointment with a liver specialist on June 7.“That is when the doctor said his liver is completely gone, and then there is the six-month period that he will need to wait for.”The couple didn’t question the abstinence policy — but that changed when Gaurav’s health took a turn for the worse in mid-June.“That’s when he got worse and that is when we questioned them, and they were still insisting ‘no’,” Grewal recalls.“Even the nurses, they were like, they are very strict about this policy and they won’t budge.”By late July Gaurav’s condition had worsened, at which time Grewal says they were told there was nothing doctors could do.“It was point of no return after that.”Gaurav, 42, died in the Vancouver General Hospital — at the six-month mark of his sobriety.Grewal said she was shocked to learn via APTN that B.C. Transplant had dropped the policy in May of this year.Last week the organization, which coordinates organ transplantation in B.C., told APTN David Dennis’s situation was a “misunderstanding”. It apologized to Dennis.Dr. Eric Yoshida, a transplant hepatologist and member of the liver transplant team at Vancouver General Hospital, also told APTN the policy had changed.“It was discussed within our team since last summer,” Yoshida explained.“Our arguments were presented and there was much debate and it’s basically been abolished,” he said. “We had dedicated meetings to this and we have our rounds every week and then it just kind of gradually became adopted as a functional policy. The general agreement with all the people on the team was probably the end of May.”But Grewal says there was no misunderstanding with her husband’s case.“The policy was still there. They never ever told us it doesn’t exist,” she said. “There was not even ever a hint that this policy does not exist.”B.C, Transplant still features the policy on its website.“All patients being considered for a liver transplant at the Solid Organ Transplant (SOC) clinic must be abstinent from drugs and alcohol for a minimum of six months.”Dr. Yoshida and B.C.’s Provincial Health Services Authority both said they cannot legally comment on Gaurav’s case due to doctor-patient [email protected]@Laurie_Hamelinlast_img read more

Posted by: | Posted on: September 17, 2019

TCI Govt Estate needs 20M injection Minister announces rentcutting plan

first_img Related Items:#GoldrayEwing, #magneticmedianews, providenciales Historic $4m road works project in Kew Town, Glass Shack, first ever sidewalks under construction Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Millennium Highway road works not behind schedule says Minister Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Turks and Caicos, August 10, 2017 – Providenciales – Government says the country could save, over the medium to long term, as much as $24m in revenue with the estate strategy decided upon at the Ministry of Infrastructure, Housing and Planning.    During his ministerial statement in the House of Assembly last month, Minister #GoldrayEwing said it would first take an investment though of $20m to resuscitate and renovate the Government properties across the islands.Minister Ewing said a government complex is coming for Provo.  “Mindful of the poor state of the existing Government Estate and the high level of costs associated with renting accommodations from within the private sector, to achieve savings in the medium to long term the Government is currently giving consideration to constructing purpose built accommodation in #Providenciales.   A Framework Document has already been produced and presented to Cabinet with a Working Party having subsequently been established to develop the concept further.”This will mean cutting down on rent to private citizens by Government, renegotiating existing leases and transferring financial liability to landlords if there are any new lease agreements for government office spaces.    The Minister said a government complex also makes sense for Grand Turk.#MagneticMediaNews New, stringent posture on illegal construction makes fines, personal demolition and possible deportation legal says PDM Minister, law now passedlast_img read more

Posted by: | Posted on: September 11, 2019

PHOTOS WilmingtonTewksbury Chamber Of Commerce Holds Women In Business Event

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Posted by: | Posted on: September 11, 2019

VIDEO Watch Peking And The Mystics Perform A Concert On The Common

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Posted by: | Posted on: September 11, 2019

TRAFFIC ADVISORY Paving Projects On Middlesex Ave Woburn St Hillside Way To

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Posted by: | Posted on: September 10, 2019

2020 Hyundai Ioniq update brings sharper looks more EV range

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Posted by: | Posted on: September 5, 2019

Monsanto JV faces antitrust probe in India for overpricing GM cotton seeds

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Posted by: | Posted on: September 5, 2019

Two wheeler sales How Royal Enfield performed in September

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