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June, 2021

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Posted by: | Posted on: June 23, 2021

Super Rugby Referees confirmed for round 4

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Victor Matfield getting on the wrong side of the refereeThe match officials for Week 4 of the 2011 SANZAR Super Rugby tournament have been confirmed by SANZAR.There are two changes to the schedule announced earlier. Chris Pollock will take charge of the match between the Rebels and the Sharks in Melbourne whilst Steve Walsh will referee the match between the Stormers and the Highlanders in Cape Town. Both fixtures will be played on Friday 11 March 2011.SANZAR Game Manager, Lyndon Bray said the appointment was changed as Walsh, who is returning from injury, is on his way to Europe to referee a Six Nations Test the following week. He replaces Mark Lawrence.Bray added that Pollock had been selected to replace Walsh on the Melbourne game as he was amongst the competition’s early “in form” referees.Fixtures:WEEK 4Fri 11 March Force v Blues in Perth – Referee: Nathan Pearce, Asst Ref 1: Stuart Dickinson, Asst Ref 2: Julian Pritchard, TMO: George AyoubCheetahs v Lions in Bloemfontein – Referee: Keith Brown, Asst Ref 1: Glen Jackson, Asst Ref 2: Cobus Wessels, TMO: Gerrie Coetzee PRETORIA, SOUTH AFRICA – MARCH 05: Victor Matfield of the Bulls and referee Stuart Dickinson talk during the Super Rugby match between the Bulls and Highlanders at Loftus Versfeld Stadium on March 05, 2011 in Pretoria, South Africa. (Photo by Duif du Toit / Gallo Images/Getty Images) Crusaders v Brumbies in Nelson – Referee: Garratt Williamson, Asst Ref 1: Vinny Munro, Asst Ref 2: Mike Fraser, TMO: Kane McBrideRebels v Sharks in Melbourne – Referee: Chris Pollock, Asst Ref 1: James Leckie, Asst Ref 2: Andrew Lees, TMO: Matt GoddardStormers v Highlanders in Cape Town – Referee: Steve Walsh, Asst Ref 1: Jaco Peyper, Asst Ref 2: Marc van Zyl, TMO: Shaun VeldsmanSat 12 MarchHurricanes v Chiefs in Wellington – Referee: Marius Jonker, Asst Ref 1: Mike Fraser, Asst Ref 2: Joey Salmans, TMO: Garratt Williamsonlast_img read more

Posted by: | Posted on: June 23, 2021

Five things we learnt about Wales: Round Two

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Star man: Dan Lydiate, more often seen in tackling mode, gets a pass away against ScotlandBy Paul WilliamsWALES BEAT Scotland 27-13 in Cardiff on Sunday. They’re now two from two in the Six Nations and heading towards a Triple Crown showdown in Twickenham. Let’s take a look at the plusses and minuses of Wales’ performance – and there will be more Welsh analysis throughout the rest of the championship.Lydiate is a dictatorDan Lydiate may not be the most glamorous of players. He doesn’t attract the sponsorship deals with multi-blade razor companies or boot deals with multinationals, but sometimes his performances have an impact beyond the game in which he is playing. At his best he seems to change the rules and central tenets of rugby. Lydiate made 11 tackles against Scotland. Whilst this may not be the highest tackle count in the Welsh team (Toby Faletau led with 17), Lydiate’s incredible line speed and range of ankle, waist and wrap tackles dictate where the ‘tackle-line’ is. Rugby’s coaching manuals suggests that the tackle-line sits just behind the midpoint of a ruck, maul or scrum. Yet Dan Lydiate seems to push the tackle-line back a yard or two. He appears to be permanently offside, yet rarely is. Dictating where the tackle-line is may seem irrelevant in modern rugby. Indeed you rarely hear it, as the ‘gain-line’ is rugby’s poster boy. But the tackle-line dictates just how far you have to travel in order to get to the gain-line, and whilst current defensive alignments already make it hard to get to the gain-line, Lydiate’s defensive capabilities make it even harder.All smiles: Cuthbert is congratulatedCuthbert proves the doubters wrongAlex Cuthbert’s selection against the Irish may have raised an eyebrow amongst those who hadn’t seen him play (he has scored four tries in five Heineken Cup games for Cardiff Blues), but his selection against England in a fortnight’s time won’t come as such a shock. Cuthbert was immensely effective against Scotland. His straight line speed and 16st 6lb frame saw Greig Laidlaw and Nick de Luca turned into speed bumps. His kick chase was relentless and his try-scoring pass to Leigh Halfpenny not only showed an ability to pass simply off his wrong hand, it also showed a distributive awareness that few wingers have. The rugby world may marvel at George North, but Cuthbert could become one of Warren Gatland’s most lethal assets. To use boxing parlance, Gatland can now dazzle them with the left and smack them in the face with the right.Wales have two packs of forwards A right call: Ryan Jones wins a lineoutThe lineout remains a problemWales’ lineout stats don’t look too bad. They won 83.3% of their own ball, which is an improvement on the 71.4% they won in Dublin. But don’t be fooled. Winning possession isn’t what counts; it’s the quality of possession that matters. Sadly there isn’t a stat for that, if there was, Welsh fans wouldn’t like it. Wales lost the most important lineout of the game: their first. The call was made and Huw Bennett launched the ball past Wales’ two recognised jumpers, Ryan Jones and Ian Evans, and instead targeted Faletau at the back. Wales’ technical deficiencies are often called into question when discussing their lineout frailties, but their first lineout was clearly a case of poor decision-making. With a notoriously fragile lineout, why choose to execute the most difficult of all the lineout moves on your first call? The Welsh lineout improved throughout the game, but it remains an issue that must be resolved. Wales require a lineout that their back-line can trust. They require a lineout that allows them to sit deep on their own ball, safe in the knowledge that they won’t have to make up the 30-yard gap between them and the opposition’s back-line in the event of the ball being stolen. Having not had a genuine pack of forwards for over 20 years, Wales now appear to have the makings of two. Much will be made of the Scottish pack’s performance at the Millennium Stadium, and rightly so. They generated 61% possession and anchored 59% of territory. They also had perfect lineout and scrum stats. But it is worth remembering that Wales essentially fielded a second-string eight – Matthew Rees, Alun Wyn Jones, Luke Charteris, Bradley Davies and Sam Warburton were all unavailable for selection. Wales weren’t just playing without five first-choice forwards; some of those who were selected played out of position. Ryan Jones may have become increasingly familiar with playing lock at the Ospreys, but he is far more comfortable at six or eight. And whilst Aaron Shingler must have been delighted to receive his first cap, he would rather it had been at blindside. It may be too early to talk of a genuinely deep pool of forwards, but Wales are no longer splashing in the shallows.Wales missed WarburtonSam Warburton pulled out of the Scotland game after failing a late fitness test. His replacement was the tall, sinewy, Aaron Shingler. Shingler performed ably, carrying the ball 11 times and making 13 tackles, but Wales missed Warburton enormously. It is nothing to be ashamed of. The All Blacks aren’t the same without McCaw, The Wallabies without Pocock, and the Boks without Burger or Brussow. Most noticeable were the lack of ‘offensive’ turnovers at the breakdown. We’re all used to seeing Warburton emerging from the ruck to back-slapping team-mates and rapturous applause – Warburton’s offensive turnovers are often reminiscent of a fireman plucking a missing dog from a pile of rubble. But whilst the heroics were certainly missed, it was Warburton’s dirty work which left a void. Warburton doesn’t just slow ‘their’ ball down, he speeds Welsh ball up. In Warburton’s absence, Ross Rennie arrived at everything first and his sticky fingers were all over everything. Warburton’s dead leg can’t come to life quick enough. NOT FOR FEATURED last_img read more

Posted by: | Posted on: June 23, 2021

Analysis: Giteau, Pocock and Mitchell – Wallabies emerging from the wilderness

first_img…but then sense an opportunity out wide, and fires a pass across to his Argentinean teammate:Stealing across, he can remain in the attack and collects a return flick pass……to threaten again.The likes of Matt Toomua, Quade Cooper, Foley and Beale mean midfield playmakers are rife in Australia. On the stroke of half-time, Giteau showed his ability to conduct phase-play has arguably matured with age.Fizzing on the gain-line, he throws a flat pass to Steffon Armitage:One phase later, off the back of a Mitchell carry, Mathieu Bastareaud scores:Giteau’s quick thinking and soft hands are instrumental. As Wesley Fofana sprints out of the line, the 32 year-old cooly picks off the dog-leg:The clinical transfer can be best appreciated from the reverse angle. Sebastien Tillous-Borde‘s service is transferred very nicely:Giteau look primed to round off his afternoon with a try just after the break, until he aimed an errant offload:A couple of isolated, uncharacteristic blemishes did not detract from a pivotal role in Toulon’s glorious, historic win. Cheika will certainly have noted Giteau’s influence, and well as that of his countryman out wide.Drew MitchellFor all his humorous and mighty popular social media use, Mitchell is not some kind of flashy, flaky rugby celebrity. His approach to the game is one of hard-edged honesty, of industry and commitment.This weekend, he was a talisman for Toulon. In three explosive involvements, the wing inspired his side. A first-half kick-return represented the first:A panicky clearance from Noa Nakaitaci is fielded and brought back with interest. Some neat footwork unbalances Fritz Lee and the burly No 8 gets his head in an awkward position.The reverse angle offers an insight into the venom in Mitchell’s run:Clearly, Toulon were able to stay on the front foot from this position after Lee had been bumped off.On the hour mark, Mitchell intervened when Clermont had won a scrum against the head:Above all, this is a fine piece of decision-making. As Clermont spread the ball wide and Camille Lopez loops a pass to Jonathan Davies, Mitchell rushes in to sabotage the attack.Here, we can see how far he has to travel and how, with Aurelien Rougerie lurking, there is an element of risk:But the timing is flawless, the technique close to perfect. Mitchell folds Davies by driving his shoulder into the Welshman’s midriff and pumping the legs:Not content with the tackle alone, Mitchell bounces to his feet to make a nuisance of himself at the ensuing ruck as well:A Nick Abendanon solo try reduced Clermont’s deficit to just 19-18 minutes later. Then came the crescendo:There is a lot to take in, so treat yourself to another look:Toulon’s driving lays the foundations, sucking in Clermont’s forwards before Tillous-Borde snipes, drawing replacement hooker John Ulugia. Bastareaud acts as a decoy in midfield, holding Julien Bardy just long enough for Mitchell to take the gap:Neither Ludovic Radosavljevic nor Thomas Domingo can stop the break. In the clear, Mitchell drifts towards the touchline before bursting off his right foot to bypass Rougerie:Lopez grasps at thin air and Abendanon is beaten by a left foot step:All in all, Mitchell left six defenders in his wake. His balance, in plain view below, was superb:Mitchell has stiff competition for an Australia berth, as do Pocock and Giteau. It is also two and a half years since any of these men pulled on Wallaby gold. The Rugby World Cup narrative has already taken so many intriguing twists and turns that December 3, 2012 – when each nation discovered their group-stage opponents – feels like a prehistoric date.Of course, England and Wales were slapped with a stunningly tough draw that afternoon. They would face one another, as well as Australia. Subsequent qualifying competitions have added Fiji and Uruguay to an excruciatingly difficult Pool A.At the time, the reaction from fans and everyone more closely associated with each team was almost universally one of disbelief. Two and a half years later, some of the incredulity is yet to lift. But reality checks are coming on a weekly basis.Every Super 15 game the nuclear Nemani Nadolo carves up for the Cruaders, we are reminded how slippery a banana skin Fiji will be. Rapid, hulking, dexterous Pacific Islanders do not tend to die wondering.A week ago, the Australian Rugby Union’s decision to relax their eligibility rules to consider foreign-based players with over 60 caps nudged the goalposts closer towards the Antipodes.Matt Giteau and Drew Mitchell promptly underlined their credentials by guiding Toulon to a 24-18 victory over Clermont and their third consecutive European title at Twickenham.Meanwhile, another candidate for a Wallaby jersey appears hellbent on making the trip. Two knee constructions in 12 months looked to have derailed David Pocock’s career. However, the outstanding openside – still 27 – is starring for the Brumbies and back to somewhere near his wonderful best.Between them, this trio boast 201 Test caps, 63 international tries and vital experience of World Cup knockout matches. Even more important that pedigree though, is form. And none of them are lacking in that department.Here is a run-down of their recent efforts.David PocockFriday evening in Canberra saw a high-octane head-to-head as Pocock took on incumbent Australia skipper and Waratahs number seven Michael Hooper. Two excellent, all-action performers produced a compelling individual tussle.Though Michael Cheika‘s reigning champions triumphed 13-10, Pocock was rock-solid at the breakdown and extremely strong on the gain-line. Hooper had flashes of brilliance too, scavenging well and smashing runners.Cheika will surely devote a decent chunk of the coming months to working out a way to accommodate both men in the same back row. A lineout jumper at No 8 is a must in that case. Such selection quandaries are another story. For now, Pocock’s display deserves praise.This copybook ruck turnover in the first half was a fantastic way to begin:Tracking Pocock is fascinating. He starts in the bodyguard position and, because his primary responsibility is to patrol the fringes, he is behind the defensive line as Kurtley Beale receives a pass from scrum-half Nick Phipps:Beale jinks and darts himself, looking to squeeze between Scott Fardy and Ita Vaea, who cuts down the mercurial Waratah with a low tackle. Pocock swerves stealthily behind the contact area:Steaming in on a support line, Wycliff Palu identifies the pilfering threat of Fardy and takes out the Brumbies blindside as Pocock latches onto the ball:Adopting the ‘jackal’ position, Pocock braces and is strong enough to survive the joint clear-out of Will Skelton and Dave Dennis – around 260 kilograms of second-row weight:Referee Glen Jackson is on the spot, and does not hesitate in awarding a penalty to the Brumbies for holding on as Pocock rolls back with the ball:Later in the half, Pocock almost pulled off a similar heist as Hooper stormed into midfield from set-piece:This sequence epitomises Pocock at his peak. It starts with a full-stretch scrag……before he swings back around onto his feet to compete for the ball:Sekope Kepu and Palu pile into the contact area and Jackson calls a scrum as the ball becomes unavailable. But Pocock was so close, as the reverse angle shows:Following some serious graft in the gym, Pocock has returned a stockier figure and weighs over 110 kilograms. He is putting this ballast to use in attack as well. There have been 64 carries in his last four starts.Although this one ended in a turnover – ironically as Hooper shunted into a counter-ruck – it demonstrated dynamism and penetration from a flat-footed start:Later on, with the Brumbies behind and desperate to rescue a result, Pocock found himself in a wide channel. He responded calmly and skilfully, and Joe Tomane nearly grabbed a second try:Picking up a wayward pass, Pocock backs his pace, arcs outside Skelton……before drawing in Bernard Foley and releasing the pass:This footballing ability is another big tick. In a side full of irresistible strike-runners, Australia need a few link men. And a pretty special one was in action on Saturday.Matt GiteauThe European Champions Cup decider, an all-Top 14 affair, was unsurprisingly saturated with huge collisions. That said, there was room for the odd moment of guile. Giteau sounded an early warning with this slicing break:So often the instigator of Toulon’s sweeping attack, he then linked up with Juan Martin Hernandez:Giteau was shifted to fly-half from his preferred inside centre position for the final. Here though, he is at second receiver after being played in by Leigh Halfpenny.This gives him more scope to assess the situation. Initially, Giteau shapes to kick… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Three of a kind: Giteau, Pocock and Mitchell are making a push for more Australia caps center_img Pool A at the Rugby World Cup was already deadly enough. Now Matt Giteau, David Pocock and Drew Mitchell look eager to get involved with Australia. At least one will be at the World Cup, though. All three will push hard. Perhaps it is clearer to put is this way: Pool A would be all the more deadly for their inclusion.Slowly, all of England and Wales are realising as much.last_img read more

Posted by: | Posted on: June 23, 2021

Five things we learnt: Scotland v South Africa

first_img By Rory BaldwinYou can’t out-Bok the BoksOr at least Scotland can’t.No one does physical bullying on a rugby pitch quite like the Springboks. No doubt there was a fair bit of soul-searching following the shock defeat to Japan and South Africa seem to have rediscovered their mojo in that regard. Despite picking a team aimed at limiting, if not negating, the power of the opposition (sizeable fellows from one to 15), Scotland came off a distinct second best.You know there is something wrong when Jonny Gray, arguably our best forward since he first took the field against South Africa in 2013, is looking rather ordinary. Although I suppose if you are a South Africa fan, you’d consider that normal service resumed.Japan, when they claimed their historic win against South Africa in round one, refused to be drawn into a battering contest. They went for low tackles and a tactical approach aimed at quickly moving the point of attack away from the contact area. This is what Scotland should have done, not least because it fits with the chaotic, ‘Scottish’ style of rugby Vern Cotter has them trying to play.Discipline seems (finally) to be under control…Even in a game as frustrating as that one, Scotland kept their penalty count to eight, making it single figures for the third game in a row. Compared to the painful disciplinary issues seen in the Six Nations, it’s near miraculous.As we saw on Saturday when an opportunist try and a few quick penalties in our favour took us right back into the game – and even within bonus point range for a brief spell – taking the points when they’re on offer is absolutely crucial in the high-stakes arena of the World Cup.Just ask Chris Robshaw. Fitness and discipline should see us through this one, but we can only hope the Scotland team take nothing for granted. Teams doing that haven’t done too well so far in this most absorbing of Rugby World Cups.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. Paying the penalty: Greig Laidlaw tackles Bryan Habana off the ball. Photo: Getty Images…except at crucial momentsOf course, it wouldn’t be Scotland without a brain implosion of some sort, and also it wouldn’t be Scotland if it didn’t occur at precisely the wrong time. The Tommy Seymour try hauled us back into the match but just four minutes later Greig Laidlaw took down Bryan Habana off the ball and was yellow-carded. Then David Denton gave away a couple of quick soft penalties and suddenly Handre Pollard was allowed to stretch the lead back out. Scotland never looked in it after that.Some things change, some things stay the sameDespite all the upsets, bonus points and shifting positions in the table, it all comes back to what everyone said it would: Scotland versus Samoa will decide Scotland’s fate.Island spirit: Samoa will be playing for pride against Scotland in Newcastle. Photo: Getty ImagesOf course, it was originally meant to be a winner-takes-all clash, but nobody told Eddie Jones and his men, so Samoa now find themselves with little to play for except pride. That in itself could be a dangerous situation for Scotland to find themselves in, with a vast swathe of Samoan, Japanese and more than likely most neutrals (especially those of a romantic nature) willing the Brave Blossoms adventure to continue.Scots need to be at full strengthCotter’s ability to restore his first choice XV should help Scotland to play in a more comfortable style and hopefully not try to outmuscle Samoa. A looser attacking game would play into the hands of Stuart Hogg, Mark Bennett and Finn Russell – assuming they are all fit and healthy.On the ball: Finn Russell will bring a more free-flowing style to Scotland. Photo: Getty ImagesSeveral forwards will be looking to make amends for ineffectual running against South Africa with big games and John Hardie should be passed fit from his head knock to give us a bit more at the breakdown. Matt Scott and Ross Ford have their own concussion protocols to deal with and, although Fraser Brown did enough to retain the No 2 shirt in any case, Scott would be a loss. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Power surge: Scotland try to stop a rampaging Eben Etzebeth. Photo: Getty Images After Scotland’s 34-16 defeat by South Africa, we look at why a more attacking and disciplined approach is needed against Samoalast_img read more

Posted by: | Posted on: June 23, 2021

The greatest blindsides of all time: Alan Whetton

first_imgAlan Whetton was one of the greatest blinside flankers of his time LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Alan Whetton trudging forward for the All Blacks TAGS: The Greatest Players Whetton himself had a notable tournament, scoring in every game except the final against France. At Eden Park, his home ground with Auckland, he had an unusual pre-match ritual designed to boost his try scoring. “I’d go to each corner and imagine myself dotting down. I’d pat the grass and think, ‘That could be AJ’s spot – if I was lucky enough to keep up with JK or get rid of that monstrous winger Sean Fitzpatrick!”He was renowned for his support play, pace on the blind side and work at the breakdown, and he remained a regular fixture in the side until bowing out in the 1991 World Cup semi-final against the Wallabies. Major teams: Auckland Country: New ZealandTest span: 1984-91Test caps: 35 (31 starts)Test points: 40 (10T)He was a mainstay at blindside for the All Blacks in the Eighties, playing many of his 35 Tests alongside his twin brother Gary, who plied his trade in the All Blacks engine room.Whetton’s early appearances wearing the Silver Fern were inauspicious as he came on as a replacement in his first four Tests at lock. In 1986, before starting a Test for the All Blacks, Whetton had courted controversy by travelling to South Africa with the Cavaliers. It was a controversial tour that was seen as sympathetic to apartheid and he was duly banned for two games.Worse was to come on his full debut that year against Australia when he had, by his own admission, a poor game. In his disappointment he overdid the port post-match and such was his lack of sobriety that he had to be escorted to bed before the Test dinner. Rather than mope and lament his poor judgment, it was the making of him, as he got fit and forced his way into the starting line-up for Brian Lochore’s 1987 World Cup squad.Playing in a feted back row that also included Buck Shelford and Michael Jones, the triumvirate proved a formidable unit as New Zealand swatted aside the likes of Italy, Wales and Scotland. Domestically, he played for Auckland more than 150 times before retiring to take up a three-year coaching stint with Kobe Steelers in Japan.Nowadays he works in digital sports signage at stadiums and is a regular media pundit in New Zealand.last_img read more

Posted by: | Posted on: June 23, 2021

Autumn blues: Wales looking to end 15 years of hurt when they face Australia

first_imgThe Wallabies’ visit offers another opportunity for Wales to heal a running sore – how to launch their autumn series with a victory. We look at their saga of slow starts On your toes: Sam Warburton and Dan Lydiate man the barricades as Rocky Elsom carries in 2010 (Getty) Hands up: Wales in training this week ahead of the 2017 Under Armour Series (Huw Evans Agency)That was a dark day for Wales – but each year is a new opportunity to wipe the slate clean. The next opportunity is on Saturday, when skipper Alun Wyn Jones will be one of seven Lions in the starting XV. There are three uncapped players on the bench in Dragons prop Leon Brown, and Ospreys duo Sam Cross (flanker) and Owen Watkin (centre). Don’t miss it!Wales autumn Tests* Wales v Australia, Sat 11 Nov, 5.15pm* Wales v Georgia, Sat 18 Nov, 2.30pm* Wales v New Zealand, Sat 25 Nov, 5.15pm* Wales v South Africa, Sat 2 Dec, (2.30pm) With three minutes left, the Ospreys lock latched onto a loose pass in his 22 and galloped towards the distant try-line… only for Zac Guildford to cut him down near the other end.So ended Welsh hopes of achieving a rare feat ­– avoiding defeat to the Kiwis. Stephen Jones’s four penalties, two of them late in the game, had set up the tantalising prospect of an upset, but ultimately Andrew Hore’s try and four Dan Carter goals saw the All Blacks home. It’s one of 30 New Zealand wins from 33 clashes against Wales.High rise: empty seats marked the 2010 Wallaby match that launched a poor autumn series for Wales2010: Wales 16 Australia 25There were 20,000 unsold seats for this two-score reverse, in which a young Kurtley Beale was at his sumptuous best. Tries by Man of the Match Beale, David Pocock and Ben Alexander put the game to bed long before replacement Richie Rees grabbed a late consolation to go with Stephen Jones’s goal kicks.Wales’ one bright spot was a powerful scrum that eked out six penalties, while Sam Warburton’s injury enabled Martyn Williams to come on for his 100th Test cap, four of them earned with the Lions.Things didn’t improve that autumn as Wales lost to New Zealand and South Africa and were held to a draw by Fiji.Dancing with Pumas: Joaquin Tuculet spills a high ball under pressure from James Hook Getty)2012: Wales 12 Argentina 26Who can forget Wales’ 2012 autumn series? At a critical juncture when results would shape the rankings for the upcoming RWC 2015 draw, Wales collapsed in a heap, losing to Argentina, Samoa, New Zealand and Australia to drop outside the world’s top eight.The Pumas lost two playmakers, Felipe Contepomi and Juan Martin Hernandez, to injury, but tries by Juan Imhoff and Gonzalo Camacho in the third quarter took them well clear.Halfpenny’s penalty quartet was all Wales had to show from a game in which they made no line breaks and entered Argentina’s 22 on just two occasions. The boos rang loudly at the final whistle and would be heard again that November.Flat out: Justin Tipuric makes a spectacular tackle in the 2013 opener, when injuries plagued Wales2013: Wales 15 South Africa 24Dealing with injuries is part of the game, but Wales were dealt a particularly bad hand four years ago. Liam Williams, Jonathan Davies and Adam Jones all retired hurt in the first half and the Boks capitalised with early scores by Jean de Villiers and Bismarck du Plessis.With ten Lions in the starting XV, Wales were unlikely to roll over and Halfpenny’s boot kept the scoreboard ticking.However, after a period of uncontested scrums caused by the sin-binning of Gethin Jenkins and Coenie Oosthuizen, South Africa sealed the deal with Fourie du Preez’s try 15 minutes from time. Morne Steyn garnered 16 points.We’ve been here before: Wales came close in 2014 but Bernard Foley spoiled the party (Getty)2014: Wales 28 Australia 33“We tend to start the first game in the autumn pretty slowly against a team that’s been together for a long time,” said Warren Gatland after this defeat, something you may have gathered.In truth, Wales had lots to smile about, outscoring the Wallabies four tries to three in an adventurous display. Rhys Webb, Alex Cuthbert and Alun Wyn Jones crossed before half-time and a penalty try on 64 minutes put Wales ahead and within reach of glory.Enter 18-point Bernard Foley as party-pooper, his drop-goal and penalty averting danger. Israel Folau (two) and Tevita Kuridrani scored tries and Foley got Man of the Match.Imposing backdrop: last year’s opener saw Michael Cheika’s Wallabies take Wales to the cleaners2016: Wales 8 Australia 32And so to last year, probably the most grisly of all these Welsh defeats. Stephen Moore, Reece Hodge and Tevita Kuridrani bagged first-half tries as Wales barely fired a shot – they were lucky to be only 20-3 adrift at the interval.“We were very disappointed and frustrated by that first-half performance,” said caretaker coach Rob Howley. “The players were pretty distraught at half-time. They never had a foothold in the game.”It took Wales 28 minutes to have attacking ball in the Wallaby half and territory and possession figures were off the scale for a Tier One clash.Further tries by Bernard Foley and Dane Haylett-Petty, who spoiled Sam Davies’s debut off the bench by intercepting his pass, completed the rout, with Scott Williams the lone Wales try-scorer.It was Australia’s biggest away win in the fixture since the days of Lynagh and Campese in the 1991 World Cup and vindication of Michael Cheika’s decision to play Michael Hooper and David Pocock in the same back row.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The portents for Wales aren’t promising. When they face Australia on Saturday, they will be seeking their first win in the opening match of an autumn Test series for 15 years.Gethin Jenkins, the fourth most-capped player in history with 134 Test appearances, was making his debut the last time Wales opened their autumn campaign successfully – a 40-3 defeat of Romania in Wrexham in 2002.Since then, and excluding four World Cup years when no autumn series was played, Wales have failed to win all ten of their opening November Tests.A creditable draw 11 years ago is the only ray of light amid the gloom caused by the southern hemisphere’s finest, and Warren Gatland’s men will be aiming to end a run of 12 consecutive losses to the Wallabies when they meet at the Millennium Stadium this weekend.We take a look at the first-up games that got away from Wales in autumns past…Roaring: Stephen Jones lands one of his eight successful kicks against the Springboks in 2004 (Getty)2004: Wales 36 South Africa 38Mike Ruddock was the Wales coach when the Springboks forged a 23-6 lead after half an hour, with eye-catching tries by Jaco van der Westhuyzen and Joe Van Niekerk.Schalk Burger’s yellow card turned the tide, Gavin Henson crossing twice, and Boks coach Jake White, confused by the stadium clock, threw on loads of subs thinking time was all but up, only to discover there was still eight minutes remaining.Dwayne Peel scored Wales’ third try but the visitors held on. “I really put myself under pressure,” White said afterwards.Jean de Villiers and Percy Montgomery scored the Boks’ other tries, while Stephen Jones kicked 21 points on the day Ryan Jones and Luke Charteris both made their Wales debut.Impeccable: Dan Carter scores during his Man of the Match display in 2006 – a record Welsh defeat2005: Wales 3 New Zealand 41This remains Wales’ record home defeat by the All Blacks. Dan Carter was in his pomp, scoring two tries and landing all his kicks for a 26-point haul.“He can do anything, pretty much,” said wing Rico Gear, who became the 19th player to score a Test hat-trick for New Zealand.Wales were missing six of that year’s Lions squad but the nature of the defeat was hard to stomach for the reigning Grand Slam champions, for whom Lee Byrne made his debut.King of Cardiff: Shane Williams scores Wales’ first try as they battle to a thrilling draw in 2006 (Getty)2006: Wales 29 Australia 29Ah, this was more like it! Pessimism reigned when skipper Stephen Jones departed injured with Wales trailing 17-6 to a Wallaby side featuring Matt Giteau, Mat Rogers and Stephen Larkham in a new-look 9-10-12 axis.But Wales rallied, Shane Williams and Martyn Williams dotting down as the tension and excitement mounted.A solo try by Chris Latham looked to have won it but James Hook, a replacement for Jones, brought the scores level with a 71st-minute penalty.Cameron Shepherd (two) and Giteau were other try-scorers and Australia coach John Connolly said: “What was most heartening was that defences were breached not because of weak tackling but because they had been outwitted.”Nabbed: Andy Powell is tackled by Adrian Jacobs and JP Pietersen in 2008 (Gallo Images/Getty)2008: Wales 15 South Africa 20Adam Jones led Wales out on the occasion of his 50th cap. Warren Gatland had steered Wales to a Grand Slam in his first year in charge, but they’d lost twice to the Boks that summer and this was more of the same.James Hook again came on for Stephen Jones but Jean de Villiers intercepted his pass to add to Adi Jacobs’s try and give the Boks a 20-3 cushion.Wales showed some of their famed fighting spirit and Leigh Halfpenny, a 19-year-old debutant, slotted his first Test points – he now has 668 – to go with four Hook penalties. But victory proved elusive.Over and out: Andrew Hore bags the only try of the 2009 clash that again went the way of the visitors2009: Wales 12 New Zealand 19Alun Wyn Jones has managed nine Test tries down the years but he might swap a few of them to change the outcome of one he didn’t score in this match.last_img read more

Posted by: | Posted on: June 23, 2021

Hotshot: Wasps hooker/back-row Alfie Barbeary

first_img Wasps hooker/back-row Alfie BarbearyDate of birth 5 October 2000 Born Banbury, Oxon Position Hooker/back-row Club Wasps Country EnglandWhen did you first play rugby? I was eight, at Banbury rugby club. My mum’s side of the family are very much into rugby but my dad was more of a footballer, so from a young age I was hoping to be the next Ronaldo!Then my older brother started playing rugby with a family friend and I was a bit jealous, so I went as well. I loved it and it went from there.Any childhood heroes other than Ronaldo? I looked up to people like Ma’a Nonu and (Mathieu) Bastareaud.So you were a centre… Yes. I started there at U10s and have played there most of my life. When I went to my first Wasps session at U15s, the head of the academy, Matt Davies, asked what position I was and I said, “Back-row/centre.” He said, “You’re a hooker!” So I’d play hooker for Wasps but at school I’d play centre.I played through the age grades with England and unfortunately they didn’t see me as a centre either!I’m happy to play anywhere and have played back-row too. I’ve got used to the front row now and I’m starting to enjoy it more and more. It’s how I can make it suit me really.What are your strengths?  LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Break time: Wasps’ Alfie Barbeary on the attack against Bristol (Getty Images) Meet one of the breakthrough stars of 2020 who has been called up by Englandcenter_img My ball-carries are my strongest point. Then my kick-pass-run options when I have the ball and my decision-making with that.Did you expect to have such a big impact last season? It’s been a strange one. I tore my quad and hamstring, which wasn’t the start I wanted to my first professional season. I got back just before Christmas for an A League game but tore my hamstring again, then the week I was due back was lockdown!Coming back after lockdown, I got told I’d been promoted to the first team and I was lucky enough to make my debut and play more games. It’s been surreal.What are your goals for this season? I want to be a more regular first-team player for Wasps and earn my stripes there. I’m happy to play anywhere but my end goal is to be the No 1 hooker.Who has been the biggest influence on your career? Mark Horrocks, my first coach at Banbury, was very influential. Then as I got older, Peter Walton and John Fletcher, who gave me confidence to play how I want to play. How it shouldn’t be unusual for a forward to kick it or offload.RW Verdict: Barbeary marked his first Premiership start with a hat-trick against Leicester – when playing out of position at blindside! His long-term future is at hooker and he has the rounded skill-set we often see from Kiwi front-rowers. England coach Eddie Jones clearly likes what he sees having called up Barbeary ahead of the final Autumn Nations Cup match against France. This article originally appeared in the December 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Posted by: | Posted on: June 20, 2021

‘Doing mission and creating disciples’

first_img Bishop Suffragan Diane Bruce and the Rev. Tom Callard, who helped organize the Instituto de Liderazgo, a Spanish-language institute that empowers students for ministry locally, during a Diocese of Los Angeles Convention. Photo: Janet Kawamoto[Episcopal News Service] Without a local formation program like Waiolaihui’ia in the Episcopal Diocese of Hawai’i, potential priests like Malcolm Kealanu Hee could likely never see ordination.Hee, 50, juggles two teaching positions with busy family and other responsibilities. But every other month, he spends an intense 72-hour weekend at a local retreat center, learning the academics and practicalities of ordained church leadership.“Local formation is important for Hawai’i because we need to raise up our own priests,” Hee wrote in an e-mail to ENS.“Currently, there is only one priest of Hawaiian descent. All the other priests have been transplants; many return to their homes, eventually leaving Hawai’i. Raising up our own priests will increase the likelihood of them staying here.”Similarly, in the Diocese of Los Angeles, Carlos Ruvalcaba, 42, says the Spanish language Instituto de Liderazgo, which trains laity, propelled him to local lay leadership and now, onward to discernment for ordination.“The Instituto is very important for our diocese and for the church as a whole, because we serve one of the largest Hispano/Latino populations countrywide, and we have so many people with a huge desire to serve God and their neighbors,” he said. “But, we are a community that needs to be educated and prepared to understand the structure, government, history, beliefs and life of the Episcopal Church.“It’s important that we continue supporting programs like this, since our actual systems fail to identify potential church leaders from poor and immigrant communities,” added Ruvalcaba, who was born in Guadalajara, Mexico.Like Los Angeles and Hawai’i, dioceses across the church are increasingly offering alternative programs to overcome the career, family, financial and cultural challenges inherent in more traditional formation of lay and ordained leaders.Hawai’i: a case of local formationOne such alternative is local formation, according to the Rev. Canon Liz Beasley, who is canon to the ordinary in Hawai’i. The diocese launched Waiolaihui’ia in January with three students and another person auditing part of the coursework, she said.Waiolaihui’ia means “the gathering of waters,” according to Hee, who teaches preschoolers with disabilities and also instructs university students preparing for teaching careers.“We chose this because we come from all over the state and together we are intermingling and learning. Water or “wai” is important in our culture as it sustains the taro that we grow. Water is also important in our church as an important part of the baptismal covenant. That’s how we came up with our name.”The curriculum comes from the Iona Initiative, which is based on the Iona School for bivocational priests and deacons in the Diocese of Texas. The three-year local training program for priests and deacons is currently in use in eight rural and remote dioceses, including: Wyoming, Oklahoma, Arkansas, West Texas, Northwest Texas, Northeast Texas and Mississippi, in conjunction with the Episcopal Seminary of the Southwest.“People in the program already have significant jobs and families they’ve raised and they don’t have the capability to go to seminary for three years,” Beasley said during a telephone interview. “It also doesn’t make sense for someone to spend the money to go to seminary and come back and have maybe a part-time job. That doesn’t seem financially responsible,” she added.Although the current students are all native Hawaiian and their “experience and cultures do come into the discussion and the learning” the curriculum is adaptable to any group, she said. Diocesan clergy are trained to serve as teachers and mentors; students live in community during the intensive weekend sessions. Some coursework is available on videotaped and power-point presentations and students complete substantial amounts of homework in-between sessions, she added.The cost is about $2,000 per year for students with the diocese absorbing other costs for the three-year program. It aims to prepare second-career priests for local ordination but is not a replacement for the traditional path to seminary; the diocese still sends recent college graduates to residential seminaries, she said.“We’re really excited about this,” Beasley said. “We want priests who know what it means to live in Hawai’i and are committed to being here. This is a long-range view, we figure if we’re raising up people who already call this their home, they’re more likely to stay.”The Bishops’ Native Collaborative—local formation regionallyFor the Rt. Rev. Carol Gallagher, an assisting bishop in North Dakota, another possibility is making local formation available on a larger regional scale, especially within cultural contexts.A member of the Cherokee Nation, she has been serving in Alaska recently, and crafting the Bishops Native Collaborative, (BNC) a consortium established by the bishops of Alaska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Navajoland, to provide training for lay and ordained leaders by sharing resources for theological education.Most of the dioceses have offered local training separately; this is the first attempt to do so collaboratively, she said.“It has been a struggle to raise up native leaders and part of that is not only the cost, as it is for everybody, but the radical removal from their traditional learning methodology,” Gallagher said.The BNC hopes to find “ways to do that locally but also to share our resources through technology, so that folks in Alaska can be learning alongside folks in Navajoland, even though they might be using different languages to talk about common issues,” she said during a telephone interview.Generally speaking, “Native people—and I don’t like to use universals because we’re very different, tribe to tribe, but in terms of educational processes—it’s really important to have a cohort group to be working with,” Gallagher said.“One of the challenges of going to one of our denominational seminaries often is, there’s no one there who speaks your language or understands your experience.”Additionally, church processes, such as commissions on ministry, may also tend to deter Native Americans, who rely on more communal support and feel isolated, she said.The BNC as currently envisioned would include local mentors and teachers and would present coursework via teleconferencing and other educational materials. Students could gather every month or six weeks for intensive sessions. Gallagher hopes to launch it next year.South Dakota Bishop John Tarrant said the diocese has historically trained clergy locally through the Niobrara School for Ministry but is hoping to perhaps reinvent that training via the BNC.It is also a pragmatic way of stretching limited resources as “our goal is to make it extraordinarily affordable,” Gallagher added.All of which is welcome news for Marla Liggett, 59, of Winner, South Dakota, who “keeps plugging away and hopes to be ordained eventually.”The challenges she faces exemplify those of many second-career potential clergy. She is the full-time treasurer for both Tripp and Todd counties and her family life—including grandchildren and daily visits to a local nursing home to check on her ailing 93-year-old mother—occupy much of her time.She is studying both the Old and New Testaments via an online Yale University course and meets with a local mentor on Wednesdays. On weekends, she assists at the altar at Trinity Church in Winner with the Rev. Stan Woolley.Liggett, who is part-Lakota, hopes to acquire an audio version of the Yale coursework, to listen to while driving. She is nonetheless excited about the opportunities created by the local training “to do something really new. I just did a sermon about the bent over woman and how we are kind of like that now,” she said. “Before, you just didn’t see a lot of women in the priesthood.”Engaging mission and making disciples in Los AngelesLos Angeles Suffragan Bishop Diane Bruce, who has taught classes at the diocesan Spanish language Instituto de Liderazgo, said the program works because “congregations are being strengthened by it.”With about 30 congregations engaging Hispanic ministry, the diocese benefits from the three-year program, which empowers students for ministry, in both church and community, she said.“We have lay leaders who know what’s going on and what needs to happen,” Bruce said. “Clergy are getting assistance. They are also talking about having members of the congregation go out and work in other congregations while they’re going through the Instituto to get exposed to different ways of doing church.”That’s exactly what happened for Carlos Ruvalcaba, and more. A parishioner at St. Mark’s Church in Van Nuys, California, in his third year of Instituto studies and planning to begin formal discernment for ordination in the fall.“I’ve learned a lot about my church, about the basics for almost every ministry you can get involved in, in your congregation, but the most important thing is, I’ve had the opportunity to discern some deeper questions, like is God calling me? What is he looking for me to do? What can I offer to the service of God?” Ruvalcaba said.He and others, like the Rev. Eric Law, founder and executive director of the Kaleidoscope Institute, say that current formal church structures may unintentionally deter people of color and culturally sensitive training is helpful for formation. The Kaleidoscope Institute is a Los Angeles-based consulting firm whose mission is to create inclusive and sustainable churches and communities.“Most leadership training materials in the Episcopal Church and in churches in general, come from a European and in our case English-speaking foundation. There’s nothing wrong with that, except it doesn’t work in places that are multicultural or non-European-based,” Law said.For example, a European context assumes that participants in class discussions “who have something to say” will automatically volunteer their opinions. But, in many non-European cultures, “people were trained not to speak as an individual but to speak on behalf of the community and are therefore reluctant to offer their individual thoughts right away,” according to Law. “Very often, they (non-Europeans) end up not speaking and were perceived that they didn’t want to participate,” he said.The Instituto currently has about 50 students enrolled in classes, which meet once a month on Saturdays at various locations across the diocese. Costs are kept at about $100 per student per semester, for basic expenses, according to the Rev. Roberto Martinez, vicar of La Iglesia Magdalena in Glendale, California, an Instituto co-director. Local clergy and educators serve as teachers and mentors. The classes are taught in Spanish.Subjects offered range from liturgy and preaching to church history, pastoral care, evangelism and Christian education, Martinez said. “The idea is the lay leader goes back to his congregation and is empowered to work with the priest to develop the congregation.”The Rev. Vincent Schwahn, rector of St. Mark’s, Van Nuys and a co-director of the Instituto, said sheer demographics make the Instituto an important and necessary undertaking not just for the L.A. diocese, but for the entire church … “because what we’re about in our essence is doing mission and creating disciples.“Los Angeles, is the second largest Mexican city in the world, after Mexico City, and that doesn’t even include the rest of the Latino population here,” says Schwahn.“Many of our neighborhoods are between 70 and 90 percent Hispanic,” he added. “We’re trying to adapt to our surroundings instead of ignoring immigration as a real fact of life in our neighborhoods and parishes. We have a responsibility to reach out to the community because that’s where our buildings are. Otherwise our buildings should be somewhere else.”He added that: “It’s such an exciting project it’s so wonderful to see people’s lives being changed and transformed and people getting excited about being members of their community; the Instituto has that kind of vision.”— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Comments (1) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis ‘Doing mission and creating disciples’ Dioceses empower local leaders in cultural contexts Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events September 11, 2013 at 2:30 pm Great story…………good to see locals becoming involved in the church leadership…..God bless! Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments are closed. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI center_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit an Event Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 By Pat McCaughanPosted Aug 30, 2013 Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Fr. Michael Neal says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group last_img read more

Posted by: | Posted on: June 20, 2021

Philippines: Priests negotiate surrender, baptism of homicide suspect

first_imgPhilippines: Priests negotiate surrender, baptism of homicide suspect Rector Knoxville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI [Episcopal Church in the Philippines] On May 28, 2015, Filipino Episcopal priests,  Lito Awakan, Leo Basing-at and Pablo Buyagan of the Episcopal Diocese of Northern Philippines, together with members of the Movement for the Advancement of Tribal Unity and Development (MAITUD),  effected the surrender of a suspect in the killing of a 13-year old boy from Bontoc, Mountain Province, which has caused tribal tension between the peoples of Bontoc and Tinglayan, Kalinga, the suspect’s hometown. Both towns are in the Cordillera mountains of Northern Philippines, whose tribes have a history of engagement in violent tribal wars. Prior to the surrender, the suspected assailant, Zaldy Alinong Dalog, confessed to the crime and requested that he be first baptized.The victim, Bryden Faniswa, Crisostomo, was killed on April 10, 2015 in Bontoc ili and Dalog [no connection to Mountain Province incumbent Congressman Maximo B. Dalog, Sr.) emerged as the prime suspect. The latter, who went into hiding, is a native of Basao, Tinglayan where the Diocese has recently opened mission work. Owing to the slow progress in the suspect’s arrest, the officials of various barangays of Bontoc set up a check-point on May 3, 2015 at the entrance to the town, preventing the entry of all vehicles and passengers from Tinglayan purposely to pressure the officials and people of the said Kalinga municipality to surrender the suspect.  The Bontoc officials publicly declared that no revenge nor violent action will be committed against the suspect, his family and tribe as had been the tribal practice in the past but strongly demanded that the said suspect be immediately subjected to the country’s criminal justice system.  Feeling the adverse effect of the checkpoint, the Tinglayan officials and travelers complained that it was unfair to include other barangays and people who had no involvement in the killing. A subsequent dialogue between the tribes involved ensued resulting in an agreement that the checkpoint will be suspended until May 20 to give time for the Tinglayan officials to effect the surrender of the suspect.  This was extended for five days from May 19 when no surrender nor arrest was yet made.In an earlier dialogue between the Bontoc and Tinglayan officials, the Episcopal priests suggested a pastoral approach in effecting the surrender but this was not appreciated by most participants. Despite the negative reactions, the  Rt. Rev. Brent H.W. Alawas, EDNP Bishop, directed that pastoral initiatives be pursued. The Diocese then approached MAITUD members and several meetings, including one with the family of the suspect, followed.  On May 27,  the group went back to Basao and held a meeting with the community  lasting up to almostmidnight.Early the next day, the group was invited to have breakfast at the suspect’s house and met the latter for the first time. The suspect approached The Rev. Basing-at whom he has met some years ago and confessed to the crime. He then expressed a desire to be baptized. Also, his siblings Dennis and Julie expressed a similar desire. The family and the rest of the community then walked to St. Theodore’s Episcopal Church where its vicar, The Rev. Awakan, officiated the baptism in a Eucharistic celebration. Thereafter, the group, together with the suspect and his family and other relatives proceeded to Tinglayan municipality where he was turned over to the police. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments are closed. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments (1) Anglican Communion Rector Bath, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Albany, NY Richard Leggett says: Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Posted Jun 9, 2015 April 13, 2017 at 4:25 pm This is a fascinating story. Our Diocese, the Diocese of New Westminster, has initiated a Companion Diocese relationship with the Episcopal Diocese of the Northern Philippines. The Parish of Saint Theodore of Tarsus has been named as the ‘partner parish’ of my parish, the Parish of Saint Faith’s in Vancouver. I’m looking forward to getting to know my colleagues and their parish better. Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ read more

Posted by: | Posted on: June 20, 2021

Se dan a conocer talleres y oradores de la Conferencia sobre…

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Evangelism, Director of Music Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York El evento se realizará en noviembreSe transmitirá en directo por InternetEl espacio es limitado; inscríbete pronto[15 de septiembre de 2016] El obispo primado Michael Curry será el orador principal de la Conferencia sobre Evangelismo  a realizarse los días 18 y 19 de noviembre en Dallas, Texas. Entre las oradoras y oradores también se destaca la Rda. Stephanie Spellers, canóniga del obispo primado para evangelismo y reconciliación.Esta conferencia es para cualquier persona que quiera aprender más acerca de evangelismo y explorar los recursos disponibles para compartir nuestra fe. Forward Movement y la Oficina del Obispo Primado patrocinan el evento; los anfitriones serán la Diócesis de Dallas  y la Iglesia de la  Transfiguración en Dallas, Texas, que será el sitio de la conferencia. Habrá traducción al español de todas las sesiones plenarias, los oficios devocionales y los diversos talleres.Para ver el programa y la lista con algunos de los talleres, visita. Para inscribirse,visitar.. Date prisa porque hay plazas limitadas.
La inscripción es de $125 por persona; la fecha límite es el 15 de octubre.
La inscripción no incluye ni alojamiento ni transporte. Hemos confeccionado una lista de hoteles para que los asistentes hagan sus propios arreglos.ProgramaAdemás de las oradoras y oradores que hablarán en sesiones plenarias, la presentación del panel principal, ¿Qué es el evangelismo?, contará con un grupo de evangelistas episcopales: El Rdo. Alberto Cutié, de la Diócesis del Sudeste de la Florida; Carrie Boren Headington, misionera para la evangelización en la Diócesis de Dallas; el Rdo. Marcus Halley, de la Diócesis de Misurí Oeste y María Parmer, creadora del programa Invita*Recibe*Conecta [Invite*Welcome*Connect] de la Diócesis de Texas. El Rdo. canónigo Scott Gunn, Director Ejecutivo de Forward Movement, será el moderador.Los talleres han sido diseñados tanto para principiantes como para evangelistas de mucha experiencia que buscan nuevos recursos. Visita esta página para ver la lista actual.  Entre los talleres y presentadores se encuentran:Hablar de Dios hoy: El Rdo. Alberto Cutié, rector de San Benedicto Plantation, FL, Diócesis del Sudeste de la Florida.Cómo evangelizar en el ascensor: El Rdo. Casey Shobe, rector de la Iglesia de la Transfiguración [Transfiguration], Dallas, Diócesis de DallasEvangelismo compasivo: Cómo compartir la fe sin juzgar: El Rdo. canónigo Dr. Fred Vergara, misionero de la Iglesia Episcopal para el Ministerio de Asioamericanos e isleños del Pacífico.Cómo contextualizar el mensaje de Jesús en las culturas hispanas de EE.UU.: El Rdo. Luis Andrade, rector de Santa Elena, Burr Ridge, Illinois, Diócesis Episcopal de Chicago.El hogar: De la entrada a la cocina; una intersección de estrategia de comunicaciones, formación y crecimiento: Mike Orr, director de comunicaciones de la Diócesis Episcopal de Colorado.Nuestras historias hablan de Dios: La Rda. Hershey Mallette Stephens, Iglesia de la Trinidad en Wall Street, Nueva York.Las redes sociales, el evangelismo y cómo conectarnos con las culturas emergentes: El Rdo. canónigo Anthony Guillén, misionero del Ministerio Latino/Hispano de la Iglesia Episcopal.Invita*Recibe*Conecta: Mary Parmer, directora de Gathering of Leaders.Cómo hacer el mejor vídeo de bienvenida de la historia sin fundirse: Christian Anderson y Trevor Black, de Episcopal Video Network (EVN)Transmisión en directo por InternetLas partes fundamentales de esta conferencia se transmitirán en directo por Internet a individuos y grupos que se reúnan en convenciones, grupos de debate y reuniones locales. La transmisión en directo, gratuita, se podrá encontrar en este enlace:Estas sesiones serán transmitidas en directo:Viernes9 a 10:30 A.M. (Hora del Centro): Bienvenida y presentación del panel principal.10:45 A.M.: Taller1:30 P.M.: Discurso de apertura del obispo primado Michael Curry.2:45 P.M.: Taller7:30 P.M.: Eucaristía: El celebrante es el obispo George Sumner de la Diócesis de Dallas y el predicador el obispo primado Michael CurrySábado9 A.M.: Sesión plenaria sobre el testimonio, por la canóniga Stephanie Spellers.9:45 P.M.: Taller11:30 A.M.: Sesión plenaria de clausuraContactosPara obtener más información, dirígete a Alyssa Finke al 800-543-1813,[email protected]; o a Spellers en [email protected]; o a Gunn en [email protected]: Favor de dirigirse a Neva Rae Fox, encargada de Relaciones Públicas de la Iglesia Episcopal, [email protected], o a Jason Merritt, director de mercadeo de Forward Movement, [email protected] esencialesSitio de la conferencia Iniciativas de evangelismo La Iglesia Episcopal Forward Movement: Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Evangelism Matters 2016 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Posted Sep 15, 2016 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Se dan a conocer talleres y oradores de la Conferencia sobre Evangelismo Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT last_img read more