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Researchers demonstrate extension of electronic metrology to the multipetahertz frequency range

Posted by: | Posted on: August 31, 2019

first_img Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. As Chini notes, huge strides have been made over the past few decades in using light to convey information, while at the same time, electronic devices have continued to be limited by the upper frequency limits at which electric currents can be driven. As he also notes, prior research has shown that it is possible to use light in the form of laser pulses to drive electrons through a bulk insulator at much higher than normal frequencies, but until now, there was no way to measure the oscillations of those electrons, a necessary part of applying them in a high-speed device.In this new effort, the researchers took advantage of the fact that when electrons speed up, they emit what are known as high-order harmonics, which just happen to be a direct reflection of the motion of those electrons. They used an attosecond streak camera to measure these harmonics in a silica nanofilm and noted that the light was emitted in bursts lasting less than 500 attoseconds. These findings suggest that it should be possible to build devices that use lasers to push the oscillating frequency of electrons up to 100 times that of devices currently used to test the limit (into the multi-petahertz range). Currently, Chini notes, more work still needs to be done—subtle variations that occur in the process will have to be removed, for example, and testing will have to be done to see if the same results can be obtained with materials other than silica. Also, it is still not clear if the laser-pulsed approach causes any negative impact on current production. Citation: Researchers demonstrate extension of electronic metrology to the multi-petahertz frequency range (2016, October 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-10-extension-electronic-metrology-multi-petahertz-frequency.html (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik has found a way to link previously demonstrated laser light-induced high-speed switching of an insulator between conducting states and high-frequency light emissions from insulators blasted with laser pulses. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes the techniques they used to pull off this feat. Michael Chini with the University of Central Florida offers a News & Views piece on the work done by the team in the same journal issue, and explains what hurdles still need to be overcome before devices making use of the technology can be developed. © 2016 Phys.orglast_img





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