Category: nzchspbr

nzchspbr

Asian Cup Qualifiers: 8 U-22 players among 35 India probables

first_imgNew Delhi, May 13 (PTI) Rewarding their good show in the recently concluded I-League, national football coach Stephen Constantine has called up eight talented U-22 players in 35- strong probables list for the AFC Asian Cup Qualifying round encounter against Kyrgyzstan in Bengaluru on June 13. The India camp will commence at the Andheri Sports Complex from May 20. The ones called are Nishu Kumar (Bengaluru FC), Chinglensana Singh (Shillong Lajong), Lalruatthara (Aizawl FC), Jerry Lalrinzuala (DSK Shivajians), Subhasish Bose (Mohun Bagan), Laldanmawia Ralte (Aizawl) and Isaac Vanmalsawma and Vishal Kaith (Lajong) Among the probables, Mohun Bagan goalie Debjeet Majumdar has also made the cut. “We will be having the Camp in two stages and have invited 21 players for stage 1. The stage 2 will kick-off when the remainder of the squad, ie, players from Mohun Bagan and JSW Bengaluru FC join in after finishing their respective Club commitments for the AFC Cup,” Constantine said. “For me, the start of any Camp is another opportunity to see the players. I am very excited and looking forward to working with them again,” he added. Squad: Goalkeepers: Gurpreet Singh Sandhu, Subrata Paul, Debjit Majumdar, Amrinder Singh, Albino Gomes, Vishal Kaith (U-22). Defenders: Pritam Kotal, Nishu Kumar (U-22), Arnab Mondal, Sandesh Jhingan, Anas Edathodika, Chinglensana Singh (U-22), Lalruatthara (U-22), Fulganco Cardozo, Subhasish Bose (U-22), Narayan Das, Jerry Lalrinzuala (U-22). Midfielders: Jackichand Singh, Udanta Singh, Laldanmawia Ralte (U-22), Seityasen Singh, Eugeneson Lyngdoh, Rowllin Borges, Cavin Lobo, Md. Rafique, Dhanapal Ganesh, Milan Singh, Issac Vanmalsawma (U-22), Halicharan Narzary, Bikash Jairu. Forwards: Sunil Chhetri, Jeje Lalpekhlua, Daniel Lahlimpuia, Robin Singh, CK Vineeth. PTI KHS KHSadvertisementlast_img read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

World Cup offered timely reminder of rugby’s values, on and off the pitch

first_imgRugby union They would not be the first. New Zealand have lost four World Cup knock-out matches in the last 20 years now. None of the teams who beat them went on to win the final. It is one thing to persuade yourself the fabled All Black aura does not make any difference in the week before playing them but another really to believe it the week after, too, when you are sure you are already on top of the world. There are always new lessons, then, even for a wily old dog like Eddie Jones. As one of his young standout performers, Sam Underhill, said when he was asked if he had heard of the theory that you have to lose a World Cup final before you learn how to win one: “No, but I’m a fan of it now”.Even the English may agree that South Africa’s victory was a fitting way to finish a tournament that was, after all, about opening the game to new audiences. It is easy to forget in the wash of it all what a risk World Rugby took by bringing their marquee tournament to Japan, where the game is – or was – a minority sport. There has been nothing quite like it since Fifa decided to hold the 1994 football World Cup in the US. And it has paid off. They filled almost every seat in every stadium and at the tournament’s peak won an audience of 54.8m TV viewers in Japan alone. Nick Evans Share on WhatsApp 1:11 Play Video Share on LinkedIn Facebook Share on Twitter Canada team members clean a road in Kamaishi following the cancellation their match against Namibia because of Typhoon Hagibis. Photograph: 横山純太郎/AP So in the end Jack did not kill the 15 giants. But still the Rugby World Cup had a different kind of fairytale finish. Siya Kolisi, South Africa’s first black captain, a kid from a township outside Port Elizabeth, led his team to a famous victory. And a team that once epitomised the apartheid regime was reborn, at last, as one offering the promise of togetherness. It was not long ago that the Springboks were jeered by black South Africans. Now they are being cheered by them. They have made good on Nelson Mandela’s words from 1995. “Sport has the power to unite people in a way that little else does,” Mandela said, “Sport can create hope where once there was despair.”We should not garnish it any more than that. If anything, this may be the moment to offer a timely reminder that we should not overreach or strain to explain the significance of all this. South Africa’s coach, Rassie Erasmus, was absolutely clear about the limits of what his team had achieved. The World Cup final had bought his country 80 minutes of togetherness, Erasmus said, and a couple of happy hours after the match when people back home had put aside their differences. Nothing more than that. The social problems he and Kolisi spoke so openly about this week will not be fixed by this victory. But it will give some succour and a hint, too, of what is possible. Twitter Rugby World Cup 2019 Japan ‘probably the greatest’ tournament, says World Rugby chief Beaumont – video It was a timely reminder of the best of the game because there was some of the worst on show too, in the backstage bickering between the unions about who was to blame for the cancelled matches. It was a flash of the sport’s narrow-minded side. If the World Cup offered a glimpse of what the game might become, it also showed some of what is holding it back. In Europe the game is being taken over, piece by piece, by the private equity firm CVC Capital Partners, who were recently accused of “raping the sport” of F1. Let us see how those traditional values and this newfound drive to develop the game, this desire to prioritise player welfare, hold up in partnership with a firm whose biggest worry is the bottom line.In many ways the game has changed these last few weeks. This tournament could be the beginning of something. And in many others the game remains the same. It could also be its end. Read more Pinterest ‘We are a special country’: South Africa hopes World Cup win can bring unity Rugby World Cup Since you’re here… … we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many new organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Reuse this content Topics Play Video There is also hope there for England. This was all at their expense, but they are a young team, the youngest to play in a World Cup final with 25 twenty-somethings in their squad of 32. And what they have achieved these last six weeks has to be set against the way they embarrassed themselves, and everyone else, in 2011 and 2015. England were never, have never been, better than they were on the weekend they beat the unbeatable All Blacks. It may turn out, when they finish their debrief, that they were still suffering from the hangover of that when they played South Africa. Share on Facebook That was during Japan’s game against Scotland at the end of the pool stages. It was one of those matches which meant more than can be conveyed in facts and figures like that, when the sport became about something much larger and more important than itself. It was the day after typhoon Hagibis had blown through and, around the country, they were still reckoning the damage. The official death toll was 24 when the match started, 28 when it finished. Days later it finally reached 89. Some of those deaths were just miles up the highway from the stadium.What was that match but a gesture of pride and defiance and togetherness? They were pumping floodwater out of the changing rooms on the morning of the game. One could hear the plain truth in Mandela’s words then. And one could hear it again in the little town of Kamaishi, the smallest place to host a World Cup match, where they had built their new stadium on the site of the school that was swept away in the tsunami in 2011. There never was a town that seemed as happy to be hosting a match. It was, the manager of the local rugby team said, their way of thanking the world for its support after the disaster.They never did get to play the second game that was scheduled there. It was one of the three matches cancelled because of the typhoon. It would have been the biggest fixture of the tournament for the two teams who were due to play, Namibia and Canada. But instead they got on with helping the people who lived there clear up the damage. Rugby loves to talk about its values and there they were again for everyone to see in the footage of the Canadian players shovelling mud off the roads. Share via Email Share on Pinterest Read more Share on Messenger England’s World Cup final defeat by South Africa proves Warren Gatland was right features Support The Guardian South Africa captain Siya Kolisi: ‘we can achieve anything if we work together’ – videolast_img read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

Orthopaedic Surgeon Supports Formal Training of Motorcyclists

first_imgStory Highlights Orthopaedic Surgeon at the St. Ann’s Bay Hospital, Dr. Cary Fletcher, supports the provision in the new Road Traffic Act for formal training of motorcyclists in Jamaica. He explained that the study, which was conducted during the period March 2016 to June 2018, looked at all of the patients seen in the hospital’s emergency department who had suffered an injury as a result of a motorcycle accident. Dr. Fletcher was speaking at a recent JIS ‘Think Tank’, against the background of a study conducted by the hospital’s orthopaedic team entitled, Motorcycle Injuries Seen at the St. Ann’s Bay Regional Hospital. Orthopaedic Surgeon at the St. Ann’s Bay Hospital, Dr. Cary Fletcher, supports the provision in the new Road Traffic Act for formal training of motorcyclists in Jamaica.Dr. Fletcher was speaking at a recent JIS ‘Think Tank’, against the background of a study conducted by the hospital’s orthopaedic team entitled, Motorcycle Injuries Seen at the St. Ann’s Bay Regional Hospital.He explained that the study, which was conducted during the period March 2016 to June 2018, looked at all of the patients seen in the hospital’s emergency department who had suffered an injury as a result of a motorcycle accident.According to Dr. Fletcher, the hospital saw patients from St. Ann, St. Mary, Portland, Trelawny, Clarendon and St. James. They were given a questionnaire that looked at various socio-demographic data, including age, occupation and gender.They also assessed those under the influence of alcohol and those who had smoked cigarettes and/or marijuana.“We also looked at the incidence of helmet compliance, and in terms of road worthiness we looked at the incidence of them possessing a motor bike licence and insurance and whether they were formally trained,” Dr. Fletcher said.The team is recommending formal training for all motorbike riders in Jamaica, because the study points to this as a major problem.“We found that loss of control and poor judgement when executing an overtaking manoeuvre accounted for 80 per cent of the injuries seen in the study, which means 80 per cent were preventable. Had they been formally trained, they would have likely not had these injuries,” he said.Dr. Fletcher bemoaned the fact that just three of the 143 bike riders seen in the study had been formally trained.He pointed out that of the three, one was a Canadian tourist who had been trained in Canada, the second was a policeman who had been trained on the job and the third was involved in racing.“Generally, our riders are not trained and from those studied 70 per cent of them had no licence and 68 per cent had no insurance and when we take into account that about 20 of the riders didn’t know if the bike was licensed or insured, because they didn’t own the bike, those percentages are possibly higher than the figures quoted,” he noted.According to Dr. Fletcher, the study is the only one in the Western Hemisphere that looks solely at motorbike accidents.The 155 participants (153 males and two females) ranged in age from 14 to 64 years and there were 143 drivers and 12 pillion riders.The study, which was conducted by Dr. Fletcher and Dr. Derrick McDowell of the hospital’s Orthopaedic Department, was awarded the Most Impactful Oral Presentation at the Ninth Annual National Health Research Conference, which took place from November 22 to 23, 2018.last_img read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

Swimming Advisory Issued for Indian Beach Cape Breton

first_imgUsers of Indian Beach, North Sydney, should refrain from swimming at the beach until further notice. Routine weekly testing at the site by the Department of Environment and Labour shows high levels of fecal streptococcus,an organism that often indicates the presence of disease-causing organisms. Dr. Ann Roberts, medical officer of health, advises that swimming in the affected water may result in eye, ear, nose, throat, or skin infection until the bacteria levels return to normal. Levels of micro-organisms at swimming sites can fluctuate for a variety of reasons, including rainfall, water temperature, wind direction, or the presence of pet droppings. “Swimming water quality is monitored weekly during the supervised swimming season, said Mark Farrell, district manager of environmental monitoring and compliance for the Sydney region, Department of Environment and Labour. “It is not unusual that a beach be closed temporarily during the hottest summer months.” Water quality at the beach will be tested several times throughout the next week.last_img read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

Le programme Phares ouvre des possibilités aux jeunes

first_imgEntrevue avec des personnes âgées. Rédaction de pièces de théâtre. Mentorat. Bénévolat. Voile. Voilà le genre d’activités offertes aux jeunes à risque partout en Nouvelle-Écosse grâce au programme Phares, un programme de subventions provincial. La province cherche d’autres bonnes idées pour aider les jeunes Néo-Écossais à rester sur la bonne voie afin qu’ils puissent réaliser leur plein potentiel À cet effet, le ministre de la Justice, Ross Landry, a annoncé aujourd’hui, 22 janvier, de nouvelles subventions pour l’année 2013-2014. Il a fait cette annonce au Centre d’apprentissage et d’emploi Phoenix, à Halifax. « Quand des jeunes à risque participent à ces programmes, ils ont du plaisir, ils découvrent ce qui les passionne et ils s’engagent dans leur collectivité, a déclaré M. Landry. Nos partenaires du programme Phares tendent la main aux jeunes partout dans la province et cela rend nos collectivités plus fortes et plus sûres. » Dans le cadre du programme Phares, les groupes peuvent faire une demande de subvention de 12 000 $ pour offrir des programmes destinés aux jeunes et conçus pour prévenir et réduire la criminalité. Des initiatives récréatives, éducatives, culturelles et d’aptitudes de vie peuvent prendre la forme de programmes parascolaires pour les jeunes à risque ou d’activités dans les domaines des arts des médias, de la danse ou du théâtre. « Youth on the Radar a été une expérience incroyable. Cela m’a appris qu’à travers l’art, tout le monde peut se faire entendre et amener un changement, a déclaré Caitlin Hempel, une ancienne participante à Youth on the Radar. Cela m’a aussi donné des outils ainsi que la compréhension nécessaire pour savoir comment amener des changements sociaux positifs par l’entremise de l’art. Cela m’a donné une voix. » Commencé en 2010, le programme Phares a accordé l’an dernier la somme de 240 000 $ en subventions à 20 groupes communautaires répartis dans la province. Les groupes ont rapporté près de 3 000 visites de jeunes par mois et près de 33 000 interactions positives entre des jeunes et des adultes. Plus de 150 partenariats officiels ont été établis avec des groupes pour appuyer le programme, notamment avec les services de police locaux, les programmes de santé mentale et des gens d’affaires dans les localités. « Les jeunes que nous avons le privilège d’apprendre à connaître ont du ressort, ne se laissent pas abattre et font preuve d’empathie, a déclaré Timothy Crooks, directeur général de Phoenix à Halifax. Ils veulent rester aux études, avoir de vraiment bons emplois et être en mesure de contribuer à leur collectivité. Grâce à la subvention du programme Phares, nous avons pu aider à renforcer leur détermination et leur offrir un certain soutien en cours de route. » Phoenix utilise la subvention du programme Phares pour offrir des programmes parascolaires aux enfants et aux jeunes de Mulgrave Park. Le formulaire de demande pour les subventions du programme Phare pour l’année 2013-2014 est en ligne à http://novascotia.ca/just/prevention/.last_img read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

Sunanda case Police urge court to prosecute Tharoor for murder

first_imgNew Delhi: Delhi Police on Saturday urged a city court to prosecute Congress MP Shashi Tharoor for abetment to suicide or “in alternative” on murder charge in the case of death of his wife Sunanda Pushkar in 2014.”Please frame sections 498-A (husband or his relative subjecting a woman to cruelty), 306 (abetment of suicide) or in alternative 302 (murder) IPC against the accused (Tharoor),” the probe agency told special judge Ajay Kumar Kuhar. Senior public prosecutor Atul Srivastava made the submissions during arguments on framing of charges in the case. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murderThe former Union minister, who is currently on bail in the case, was charged by Delhi Police under Sections 498-A and 306 of the Indian Penal Code. Reading out a statement of the couple’s domestics help, who is one of the witnesses in the case, the prosecutor said that the couple had fight over a girl named ‘Katy’ and some Blackberry messages. The prosecutor said that before her death, Pushkar wanted to address a press conference on the IPL issue and had said “I will not leave him (Tharoor)”. The witness had told police that one year prior to the demise, the couple used to fight a lot. Also Read – Two brothers held for snatchingsThe agency told the court that Pushkar was “distressed” and “felt betrayed” in her marital life. Police told the court that Pushkar was suffering from mental agony due to a strained relationship with her husband. She had a scuffle with her husband and had various injury marks few days before her death, they said. Police accused Tharoor of torturing his wife which abetted her to commit suicide. The probe agency told the court that according to the post-mortem report, the cause of Pushkar’s death was poisoning and 15 injury marks were found on various parts of her body, including in forearm, arms and legs. The prosecutor further told the court that Tharoor’s relation with Pakistani journalist Mehr Tarar also added to Pushkar’s mental agony. The prosecutor also apprised the court about Pushkar’s friend and journalist Nalini Singh’s statement, which is part of the charge sheet, that the relation between the couple was tense and bad. “She (Pushkar) told she helped Tharoor a lot in IPL matter. She had found some messages between Tarar and Tharoor. She refused to go to their house and instead went to Leela hotel. The relation between the couple was very bad,” Singh had said in her statement. Senior advocate Vikas Pahwa, appearing for Tharoor, refuted the submissions, saying the arguments made by the prosecutor were contrary to the bare reading of the charge sheet and the charges pressed by him were “absurd and preposterous”. The case is now listed for the next hearing on October 17.last_img read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

Air Transat and regulator sued over incident that left passengers stranded

first_imgMONTREAL – An air passenger rights advocate is suing the Canadian Transportation Agency and Air Transat over decisions related to incidents last summer that left hundreds of passengers stranded on the tarmac for hours.Gabor Lukacs is asking the Federal Court of Appeal in Halifax to overturn the regulator’s decision in November to waive the $295,000 fine it imposed after finding the Montreal-based airline had committed several violations of transportation rules.Lukacs said the fine was just a “slap on the wrist” that is far below the level included in its enforcement manual.“The penalty is unfit and unreasonable in light of the seriousness of the violations, the extreme suffering they have caused to passengers,” said the 12-page application.He added that there is no deterrent value if fines are reduced by the amounts passengers receive in compensation.In his application, Lukacs said the administrative penalty amounted to just five per cent of the maximum available fine even though the regulator found Air Transat committed 590 violations that captured international attention.And by waiving the fine, “public money” owed to the government is diverted to passengers as compensation.Lukacs wants the penalty overturned and sent back to the CTA for reassessment. He is also asking the court to rule that the regulator doesn’t have the authority to waive penalties for violations.Nearly 600 passengers were kept on board two flights arriving from Europe that were diverted to the Ottawa airport on July 31 due to bad weather.Passengers were trapped aboard the jets for about five hours and testified at public hearings about sweltering heat, a lack of water and the stench of vomit in the cabin.The Air Transat flights were just two of 20 large planes that were diverted following the closure of Trudeau International Airport in Montreal and Toronto’s Pearson International Airport. One of the aircraft was the double-decker Airbus A380.The unscheduled arrivals put pressure on Ottawa airport, which struggled to refuel the aircraft amid a breakdown in communication.The CTA declined to comment about the lawsuit because it is before the courts.Air Transat declined to comment on the lawsuit but said it will pay $500 to each passenger on four flights diverted to Ottawa that day, including two that weren’t investigated by the CTA.Spokesman Christophe Hennebelle said the company has processed payments that represent more than 80 per cent of the imposed fine.“We are paying the difference to the CTA, but will nevertheless pursue our efforts to pay the full $500 to every single of our passengers for the four flights,” he wrote in an email.During the hearing, the airline said the events were the result of a confluence of factors beyond its control that is comparable to a force majeure event.However, in its ruling the CTA said Transat tariff rules require it to offer drinks and snacks and consider whether or not to let passengers disembark after a 90-minute delay.The agency also determined that it had no statutory authority to award compensation to passengers for inconvenience or pain and suffering.In addition to compensating passengers for expenses incurred, it ordered Air Transat to properly train employees, including pilots, about their obligations under Air Transportation Regulations.last_img read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

Nordea appoints new CEO amid calls to boost profitability

HELSINKI — The Nordic region’s largest bank, Nordea, has appointed insider Frank Vang-Jensen as its new CEO as the firm faces growing pressure to lower costs and boost revenue after years of restructuring.The bank, based in Helsinki, said Thursday that Vang-Jensen, the current head of Nordea’s personal banking division, will take over with immediate effect from Casper von Koskull, who announced in June his retirement next year.Vang-Jensen, a 51-year-old Dane, joined Nordea in 2017 having earlier worked as a CEO of Swedish bank Svenska Handelsbanken.Europe’s largest activist investor, Cevian Capital, took a 2.3% stake in Nordea in 2018 and its co-founder, Christer Gardell, has urged the bank to speed up its cost-cutting to catch up with rivals on profitability.Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden are Nordea’s home markets.The Associated Press read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

UN Security Council condemns massacre in eastern DR of Congo

The United Nations Security Council today condemned “with the utmost firmness” the weekend massacre of dozens of people in a village in the South Kivu region in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and called on the UN mission to investigate the tragedy and report back as quickly as possible.The Council also called on the DRC authorities “to prosecute and bring to justice expeditiously the perpetrators and those responsible for these crimes” in Ntulu-Mamba and requested the UN Organization Mission in the DRC (MONUC) to give the Government the necessary support.It stressed the need to end attacks by armed groups on the local population, especially in the eastern Kivu and Ituri districts, “which not only cause further suffering to civilians but also threaten the stability of the entire region, as well as the holding of elections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.”The Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda (FDLR), which gave a commitment in Rome at the end of March to end the armed conflict and repatriate its combatants, should abide by that commitment, it said.It welcomed the robust actions MONUC has been undertaking to fulfil its mandate and the assistance it was giving the DRC’s Armed Forces in improving security conditions for the population.Before the Council took action today, MONUC head William Lacy Swing, said the weekend incident underscored what was perhaps the main hindrance to progress in the DRC: the ongoing presence of foreign armed groups. “We have to get the foreign armed groups out of the Kivus as quickly as possible,” he said.The UN’s voluntary repatriation programme had gone very well up to this point, with some 12,000 ex-fighters having left the country. But over the past year, very little progress had been made.”We have been instituting a number of security initiatives to try to get them to go home,” he said, adding that: “Also important is that we have to do our best to support the Congolese authorities in developing a new integrated republican army.”On the upcoming elections in the DRC, Mr. Swing said that there was a lot of enthusiasm, inside and outside the country, to ensure that this fall’s ballot was successful. Indeed, the country was perhaps closer to holding democratic elections than at any other time in its history since the 1960’s, he said, adding that a lot of things were coming together that made the holding of elections “pretty much irreversible.”And while the elections were on track, they would perhaps be the largest such operation ever supported by the UN. At 2.3 million square kilometres, the DRC was certainly the largest country the UN had assisted with elections. It also had an electorate that numbered at least 28 million. Indeed the sheer size of the DRC posed a wealth of challenges: It was more like a sub-continent, and contained a vast territory perhaps the size of Europe that had no roads. Mr. Swing added that no one had any identification cards in memory, and there had been no national census since 1984. “So this is the massive challenge that they face,” he said. read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

US stocks rise sharply at the open after rate cut from China

U.S. stocks rose sharply in early trading after a surprise interest rate cut in China and a hint of further stimulus for Europe from the head of that region’s central bank.The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose nine points, or 0.5 per cent, to 2,062 as of 9:31 a.m. Eastern time Friday.The Dow Jones industrial average climbed 103 points, or 0.6 per cent, to 17,882. The Nasdaq composite gained 48 points, or 1 per cent, to 4,750.The price of oil rose 73 cents to $76.58 a barrel in New York.Bond prices rose. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.33 per cent. by The Associated Press Posted Nov 21, 2014 7:40 am MDT US stocks rise sharply at the open after rate cut from China, hint of stimulus in Europe AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

SMMT welcomes Egyptian delegation

The leader of the Egyptian delegation, Laila El Maghraby, will kick off proceedings with a short introduction to each visiting company before a keynote speech from UKTI’s Shakeel Mughal, an economist on the North African region. Mughal will provide detailed information on Egypt and the surrounding markets for the UK attendees. The day will end with a presentation from Control Risks regarding safety when travelling abroad on business. As the day concludes, UK businesses will be encouraged to attend separate one-to-one business discussions with the attending Egyptian companies. The International Business Group provides a unique forum in which companies, both large and small, can share knowledge of the latest developments in key automotive markets around the world, providing access to a pool of expertise on business practices within those markets.  The next meeting is scheduled for 27 October 2009 and those looking to attend should contact international@smmt.co.uk  Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window) A delegation of more than 20 Egyptian companies seeking a wide-ranging introduction to the UK automotive industry has arrived in the UK on a trade mission arranged by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders. Representing vehicle and component manufacturers in the North African market but with a primary focus on Egypt, the delegation will attend SMMT’s International Business Group (IBG) meeting in Birmingham tomorrow (16 June) encouraging automotive trade links between the UK and Egypt. read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

Society asks more of schools than it did a generation ago Education

Teachers are now expected to be social workers, speech therapists and keep an eye on pupils’ health, the Education Secretary has suggested.Damian Hinds said that “society asks more of schools than it did a generation ago”, as he recognised the scale of the demands placed on teachers.Teachers are now expected to look after pupils’ mental health and check for signs of radicalisation, as well as monitor health and social issues such as domestic violence. Addressing primary school leaders at the National Association of Headteachers (NAHT) annual conference, Mr Hinds was the first Tory Education Secretary for over two decades to avoid being heckled by delegates.Offering an olive branch to teachers, he said: “I certainly don’t pretend that I can just stand up here at this podium and say a few words that will solve all the challenges that you face in your school today.“It is true that schools get more funding that they used to. But it is also true that society asks more of schools than it did a generation ago.” Mr Hinds was the first Tory Education Secretary for over two decades to avoid being heckled by delegates  Mr Hinds was the first Tory Education Secretary for over two decades to avoid being heckled by delegates  “But there have also been real cost pressures on schools, for example on pensions and national insurance,” he added.“I know that it is challenging for schools, managing the budget. And I do pledge to work with you to bear down on cost pressures as best we can, working closely with you to make sure that schools can get the best deals possible and target precious resources at the front line.”Last month a joint survey of teachers carried out by the National Education Union and the Child Poverty Action Group found that teachers say they are having to wash their children’s clothes and loan parents money.Staff at some schools told how they keep a washing machine and tumble dryer on site, as well as clean underwear for pupils who are sent to school wearing dirty garments.An NAHT spokesman welcomed Mr Hinds’ comments, saying: “It is encouraging to hear the Secretary of State acknowledging the extra demands that are placed on schools at the moment.“Activity in schools is often seen as an automatic way to solve a deep-seated issue in society, but it must be understood that schools cannot solve these problems on their own.“It’s also important to acknowledge that these extra expectations come at an extra cost, and many of the sources of support that schools once relied on have been cut or now have to be bought in.” Mr Hinds went on to say that compared to other countries, English schools get more government funding per pupil than Germany, France or Japan, according to OECD data. The spokesman went on: “Mental health services, speech and language therapy and some social care services are examples of how schools are filling the gap in new ways.“As we’ve said, rising costs in other areas are a big factor. Pension and national insurance contributions are currently adding extra stress to school budgets.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

Over 1000 households without power as storm hits West

first_imgESB CREWS ARE battling to reconnect over 1,000 households and businesses in the West this afternoon, amid high winds across the areaOver 600 customers were left without power in Connemara this afternoon. There were also a large number of customers cut off from the network near Templemore in Tipperary, where over 15o households were affected.Elsewhere, there were around 90 people offline in Dingle, Co Kerry and 95 in Ballyhaunis, Co Mayo. Smaller clusters of houses were also left without power elsewhere.ESB Networks are giving regular updates and answering questions on outages via Twitter, while realtime information is available on the agency’s Power Check page.Met Éireann has issued an ‘orange alert’ warning for today, as winds of up to 130 sweep the West and Northwest.Read: ‘Stay away from the coast’: Warnings issued as storm expected to hit hardest todaylast_img read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

There is a brand of pregnancy test that may be giving false

first_imgEnsure that all relevant staff institution are informed of this informationBe vigilant using the deviceReport any concerns regarding this product (or any other medical device) to the HPRA Kora Healthcare says that they investigating the incidents and have contacted affected customers. They say that anyone who used the product should exercise vigilance.Anyone with any questions about the notice can contact Kora on 01-890 0406.Read: “Every minute counts.” – Study shows why treating strokes immediately is vitalRead: Universal health insurance by 2019? No chance, says Varadkar A SAFETY NOTICE has been issued over a brand of pregnancy tests that may be giving users false positives.The Health Products Regulatory Authority (HPRA) says it has been told of two batches of Clungene Pregnancy tests that may be giving off the false reading.“The HPRA has been notified of the occurrence of false positive results with Clungene Pregnancy tests lot numbers 13122001 and 14060301. The Irish distributor Kora Healthcare has confirmed that these devices are on the Irish market. The manufacturer is currently investigating this issue. Users are advised to exercise vigilance using this product pending completion of the manufacturer’s investigation.”The notification is aimed at health professionals and the HPRA says it advises people to:last_img read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

Tensions peak over university action

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Tensions in the higher education sector peaked after administrative employees of two Athens universities decided to prolong their strike action into an 11th week, continuing their protest against a government overhaul of the civil service, while rifts appeared between the management and academic leadership of Athens University.Employees at Athens University and the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) decided on rolling 48-hour strikes, starting from Tuesday, despite warnings by Education Minister Constantinos Arvanitopoulos that the walkout is sabotaging the studies of thousands of young Greeks and reports that the government will issue civil mobilization orders to force the employees back to work if necessary. Students too have appealed for the universities to reopen for fear of losing the first semester of the academic year. The government is expected to give striking workers until Wednesday to stop their action before intervening.Professors at both universities were planning to attempt to start lessons on Tuesday, in a symbolic protest at the deadlock.The situation was particularly tense at Athens University on Monday night after all members of the institution’s senate resigned, protesting the prospect of police entering the faculty grounds in coming days and at the publication of the names of the administrative staff who have been inducted into a mobility scheme of transfers and layoffs.Meanwhile the university’s rector, Theodosis Pelegrinis, took legal action against the institution’s managing council for blaming him for the fact that the university has not operated for weeks. Pelegrinis sued the council for slander for 1 million euros. Source: Kathimerinilast_img read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

ECB turns the screws on Greece

first_imgThe bank holiday has been extended by at least two days (until Wednesday night), but local lenders are now just a step away from serious solvency problems after the European Central Bank decided on Monday to increase the haircut on the collateral they use to draw liquidity.Frankfurt’s decision sent shock waves through Greece’s banking sector as hardly anyone had expected it would use a haircut on collateral to send its own message before the political decisions expected on Tuesday in Brussels. In doing so, the ECB is further increasing the pressure on the Greek government to agree to a deal at Tuesday’s eurozone summit, otherwise the country’s banks may face a sustainability problem on top of their liquidity woes.The haircut increase reduces the last cash banks can draw from the emergency liquidity assistance (ELA) by two-thirds, running the risk of finding themselves unable to complete any transactions and thus be deemed insolvent.The European Stability Mechanism (ESM) warned late last week that Greece’s failure to pay a 1.6-billion-euro tranche to the International Monetary Fund on June 30 constitutes a payment default and allows the ESM to immediately demand all the funds it has lent to Greece and confiscate all bank shares controlled by the Hellenic Financial Stability Fund (HFSF).Banks estimate that after Monday’s decision the ceiling on the cash available for them to withdraw has dropped from 18 billion euros before the haircut increase to just 5 billion. A similar increase at Wednesday’s ECB meeting would mean that Greek banks would be unable to cover the liquidity they have already drawn with new collateral.The ECB also kept the limit on the ELA available to Greek lenders unchanged and will review the situation at Wednesday’s meeting, i.e. after the completion of Tuesday’s eurozone summit.Bank officials are clearly saying that the country has reached the point of no return and is at risk of bankruptcy unless there is an immediate agreement between the SYRIZA-led government and Greece’s creditors.Source: Kathimerini Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

Police looking for suspect in assault at MidwayArea Arbys

first_img SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Authorities reached out to the public Thursday for help in identifying and locating a man who savagely beat a fellow customer at a Midway-area fast-food restaurant in violence apparently sparked by road rage.The assailant, seemingly angry with the other man for cutting him off while they were parking their cars outside the Arby’s in the 3700 block of Midway Drive about 7 p.m. Monday, got into a confrontation with him after they entered the business, according to San Diego police.During an ensuing argument, the enraged man punched the victim eight times in the head, sending him collapsing to the floor. The attacker then stomped on the other man’s head with his feet before leaving the eatery and driving off in a vehicle of unknown type.Medics took the victim to hospital, where he was treated for an orbital fracture, police said.A surveillance camera inside the restaurant captured images of the assailant, a muscular white man about 30 years old with close-cropped hair shaved off completely on the sides of his head. At the time of the assault, he was wearing black shorts, a long-sleeved black Nike-logo shirt and black tennis shoes with white soles.Anyone with information about the case is asked to call San Diego County Crime Stoppers at 888-580-8477 or contact the agency online at sdcrimestoppers.org. Tipsters can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. KUSI Newsroom Categories: Local San Diego News Posted: May 9, 2019 May 9, 2019center_img KUSI Newsroom, FacebookTwitter Police looking for suspect in assault at Midway-Area Arby’slast_img read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

Global Markets Asian shares pause near eightmonth high dollar weakens

first_imgAsian markets outside India trade higher on 21 OctoberReuters file [Representational Image]Asian stocks held near eight-month highs on Thursday and the dollar slipped again on expectations global interest rates will stay lower for longer after a dovish turn by the European Central Bank and milder than expected U.S. inflation.The British pound was little changed after European leaders agreed to extend the deadline for the UK to leave the union to the end of October, averting a potential crash out of the bloc on Friday with no divorce deal.But investors’ risk appetite was generally capped by U.S. threats earlier this week to slap tariffs on goods from the European Union.MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan paused after four straight days of gains but held near its highest since last August.Japan’s Nikkei eased 0.2 per cent as the yen strengthened.Overnight, European and U.S. shares gained. On Wall Street, the S&P 500 added 0.35 per cent, the Nasdaq climbed 0.7 per cent while the Dow was barely changed.[.N]”There were big worries last year that central banks globally are moving towards policy tightening. Those fears have reversed now,” said Shane Oliver, chief economist at AMP.”There have also been easings in Asia. That is a reasonably positive backdrop for equities,” Oliver added.”The complication is the growth slowdown.”On Wednesday, the European Central Bank (ECB) kept its loose policy stance and warned that threats to global economic growth remained. The ECB has already pushed back its first post-crisis interest rate hike, and President Mario Draghi raised the prospect of more support for the struggling eurozone economy if its slowdown persisted.In response, European bank stocks declined and the yield on Germany’s benchmark 10-year bond fell to a one-week low of negative 0.039 per cent.Separately, data showed U.S. consumer prices increased by the most in 14 months in March but underlying inflation remained benign against a backdrop of slowing global economic growth.Minutes from a March 19-20 meeting of Federal Reserve policymakers showed they agreed to be patient about any changes to its interest rate policy as they saw the U.S. economy weathering a global slowdown without a recession in the next few years.U.S. Treasury yields slipped in response, reinforcing expectations that the Fed would hold rates steady or possibly cut them by the end of the year.However, AMP’s Oliver said some encouraging economic signs were now emerging, helped by the “great retreat” on policy by global central banks, fiscal stimulus in China and progress in Sino-U.S. trade talks.U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said on Wednesday the United States and China have largely agreed on a mechanism to ensure that both sides stick to the deal, including establishing new “enforcement offices.”Investors will next focus on inflation data from China at 0130 GMT. A weak number could raise fears of deflation spreading across the world, while a pick-up could add to optimism that government support measures are slowly beginning to percolate through the economy.In currencies, the dollar index fell for a fourth straight day to 96.909. The euro was barely changed at $1.1278 while the Japanese yen paused after three days of gains at 111.03.Sterling traded at $1.3095, unchanged on the day and staying in a triangle holding pattern between $1.2945 and $1.3380 during the past month or so.In commodities, Brent futures eased 14 cents to $71.59 a barrel. U.S. crude dipped 24 cents to $64.37.Gold hovered near a two-week top on Thursday at $1,307.795 an ounce as investors fretted about the global economy and trade tensions.last_img read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

Trump aide who mocked McCain quits

first_imgUS Republican presidential nominee Senator John McCain (R-AZ) speaks at a campaign rally in Defiance, Ohio on 30 October 2008. Photo: ReutersA Trump communications aide who joked about US Senator John McCain’s battle with brain cancer has left her White House job, a White House spokesman said on Tuesday.During an internal meeting last month, White House aide Kelly Sadler dismissed McCain’s objection to President Donald Trump’s pick for CIA director by saying it “doesn’t matter, he’s dying anyway,” a source familiar with the meeting told Reuters.Sadler’s remarks were widely condemned. The White House refused to confirm or deny whether Sadler had said them.”Kelly Sadler is no longer employed within the executive office of the president,” White House spokesman Raj Shah said in a statement.McCain, 81, was diagnosed with an aggressive form of brain cancer last year. He has been receiving treatment in his home state of Arizona and has been absent from the Senate for months.McCain, who was tortured as a prisoner of war in Vietnam, had released a statement after CIA nominee Gina Haspel’s Senate confirmation hearing, denouncing her for refusing to condemn torture. He recommended that his fellow senators vote against her, but the Senate confirmed Haspel 54 to 45.McCain has been a frequent critic of Trump. In 2015, Trump denigrated the former Navy flier’s military service, telling a gathering of religious conservatives, “He’s not a war hero. He was a war hero because he was captured. I like people who weren’t captured.”last_img read more

CONTINUE READING
nzchspbr

Trump tangles with Latino newsman launches fresh attacks on GOP rivals

first_imgDUBUQUE, Iowa — To anyone who thought Donald Trump might soften his tone after a new round of criticism of his presidential campaign, the Republican front-runner proved here Tuesday night that he will not be tamed.Trump booted the nation’s top Latino newsman out of his news conference, but moments later he let Univision’s Jorge Ramos reclaim his seat in the front row, and the two men sparred passionately about illegal immigration.Next, Trump added to his enemies list. He refused to apologize to Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly, whom he ridiculed anew on Twitter on Monday night. He launched fresh attacks on Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, two GOP presidential rivals. And he sprinkled spicy slams against former Florida governor Jeb Bush, another Republican contender, throughout his speech at a rollicking rally.To top it off, Trump went after the entire political class in Trumpian fashion, saying he wants to outlaw teleprompters (one of his best applause lines of the night) and asserting that as soon as politicians get to Washington, they become “impotent.”“They look at these beautiful buildings, these beautiful halls, and all of a sudden they become impotent,” Trump said, as the crowd laughed. “Is that an appropriate word? I think so.”Trump’s lively visit to Dubuque, where he rallied an estimated 3,500 supporters inside a convention hall on the banks of the Mississippi River, comes as he expands his campaign in Iowa and other key states.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mrdjM6qtkrsTrump appeared onstage with Sam Clovis, a prominent Iowa conservative activist who had been former Texas governor Rick Perry’s state chairman but abruptly defected from Perry’s camp because of fundraising troubles. Trump poached Clovis and named him a national campaign co-chairman and policy adviser. Trump’s top Iowa strategist, veteran organizer Chuck Laudner, is a friend of Clovis and had been courting him for weeks.Trump also announced five additional staffers in several early-voting states, including Charles Muñoz as his Nevada state director. In South Carolina, Nancy Mace, the first female graduate of the Citadel, is now Trump’s state coalitions director, while James Epley is his upstate regional director. He announced hires in New Hampshire as well.Trump, who is leading GOP polls nationally, said in an interview that he is determined to expand his campaign in the coming weeks, moving from a small circle of aides to a national grass-roots operation that he hopes will sustain the momentum he has built this summer with raucous speeches and seemingly nonstop appearances on television talk shows.“They said I wouldn’t run. They said I would not file the papers. They said I didn’t have a campaign,” Trump said, with a hint of exasperation. “Well, I did — and I do.”Two minutes into Trump’s news conference here Tuesday, the candidate had a tense exchange with Ramos, one of the country’s most recognizable Mexican-Americans.Ramos stood up in the front row of journalists to ask Trump about his plan to combat illegal immigration. But Trump did not want to answer.“Excuse me,” he said. “Sit down. You weren’t called. Sit down.”Ramos, holding a piece of paper, calmly said: “I’m a reporter, an immigrant, a senior citizen. I have the right to ask a question.”Trump interrupted him. “Go back to Univision,” he said. Then Trump motioned to one of his bodyguards, who walked over and physically removed Ramos from the room.The ejection lit up social media. Reporters asked Trump why he removed Ramos. At first, he accused Ramos of violating his news conference protocol. “He stood up and started screaming,” Trump said. “He’s obviously a very emotional person.”But moments later, Ramos returned to his seat in the front row — and Trump called on him. For five minutes, they tangled over immigration policy, an issue on which both men have passionately different views.“Here’s the problem with your immigration plan,” Ramos said. “It’s full of empty promises.”He said it would be unconstitutional to deny citizenship to what Trump calls “anchor babies,” children born in the United States to undocumented immigrants. The candidate disagreed, saying that it could be done as an act of Congress and that some legal scholars argue that the 14th Amendment should be changed.“A woman’s getting ready to have a baby,” Trump said. “She crosses the border for one day, has the baby — all of a sudden for the next 80 years, we have to take care of” the child.Recommended: Donald Trump wants to buy a football club in ColombiaThe next question from Ramos: How do you build a 1,900-mile wall across the U.S. border with Mexico?“It’s very easy,” Trump said. “I’m a builder. . . . What’s more complicated is building a building that’s 95 stories tall.”The questioning continued. At one point, Trump said, “I can’t deal with this.” A Trump aide interrupted and asked Ramos, “Is there one question — one question?”Yet Trump let the questioning continue, seemingly determined to prove his case. “I have a bigger heart than you do,” he told Ramos. “We’re going to do [deportations] in a very humane fashion.”He went on to assert that gang members in Baltimore, St. Louis and other cities are illegal immigrants.“Listen, we have tremendous crime,” he told Ramos. “We have some very bad ones. Do you mind if I send them back to Mexico?”Ramos replied, “No human being is illegal, Mr. Trump.”The candidate’s response: “Well, when they cross the border, from a legal standpoint, they’re illegal immigrants when they don’t have their papers.”When Ramos pressed Trump on polls showing his unpopularity among Latinos, Trump would not accept the premise and turned the question on him: “How much am I suing Univision for right now? Do you know the number? I know you’re part of the lawsuit.”“I’m a reporter,” Ramos said.“Five hundred million dollars,” Trump replied. “And they’re very concerned about it, by the way. I’m very good at this.”– – – –Costa reported from Washington.© 2015, The Washington Post Facebook Comments Related posts:Tico brewer avenges Trump comments on immigrants Univision breaks with Donald Trump over immigration comments Macy’s is latest company to dump defiant Trump Costa Rica also tells Donald Trump: ‘You’re fired’last_img read more

CONTINUE READING